New York City Life Expectancy Rises to 80.6 Years, Above National Average

The life expectancy of a New York City baby born in 2009 is 80.6 years, three years higher than in 2000 and above the national rate of 78.2 years, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said today.

The mayor cited the city’s health interventions, including its anti-smoking campaign and expanded testing and treatment for the HIV virus. Bloomberg released the figures today in joint statement with Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs and Health Commissioner Thomas Farley.

The life expectancy for 40-year-olds in New York increased by two-and-a-half years to 82 from 2000 to 2009, the mayor said. The gain was greater than the 1.2-year increase for the same age group in the U.S. as a whole.

The mayor is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP.

To contact the reporter on this story: Henry Goldman in New York at hgoldman@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Schoifet at mschoifet@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.