Hot off the Griddle: November 30

Good afternoon, and welcome back to the Griddle, a morning menu of fortified items for the busy person's media diet. Violent thunderstorms marred the opening of international talks on climate change this week, and the news out of Durban remains turbulent. China, Brazil and other developing nations want to extend the soon-to-expire Kyoto Protocol, which legally limits greenhouse gas emissions in participating industrial countries. The U.S. prefers to scrap Kyoto, which it never joined anyway, and focus on non-binding agreements like those reached in Cancun last year that include both rich and poor nations. Su Wei, Beijing's lead negotiator, told Bloomberg News's Alex Morales  yesterday: "If we cannot get a decision for the future of the second commitment period, the whole international system on climate change will be placed in peril."

And now the news:

Brazil Joins China Ruling Out Climate Pact Without Kyoto (Bloomberg)
Climate Change Drives Up Insurance Costs (Boston Globe)
Top Banks Branded 'Climate Killers' Over Coal (BusinessGreen)
EPA Rule That Kills Jobs Can Create New Ones (Bloomberg)
Map: Texas Cities Running Out of Water (Texas Tribune)
Brown Pollution Cloud Intensifies Indian Cyclones (LA Times)
America Is Still a Giant Oil Importer (Slate)
The Problem with Renewables and 'Cost Parity' (Grist)
Alaskan Community Revives Bid for Climate Damages (Guardian)
BP May Pay More for 2006 Alaska Spill After Second Rupture (Bloomberg) 
BoA Backs $350 Million SolarCity Military Housing Project (NYT)
Seven Disasters Seen from Space (MNN)
Newmont Halts Work at $4.8 Billion Peru Gold Mine on Protest (Bloomberg Businessweek)
NASA's Most Adorable Model Spaceships (Wired)

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