U.S. Heating Demand to Be Lower This Week, Climate Center Says

Most of the U.S. will have milder weather this week than normal, according to the U.S. Climate Prediction Center’s heating degree days forecast.

The natural-gas weighted degree days for the week will be 146 in the six New England states, or 35 below normal and 27 fewer than a year ago, according to the forecast. The measure will be 128 in the mid-Atlantic region, which is 44 below normal and 17 fewer than last year.

Heating degree days, calculated by subtracting the daily average temperature from a base of 65 degrees, are designed to show energy demand. Higher values mean cooler weather and more energy being used to heat homes and business.

Energy-weighted degree days give more value to areas where there are higher populations using oil, gas, or electricity to stay warm. The climate center issues forecasts on a state-by- state basis, as well as for nine regions, for gas, oil and electric heating demand.

Eight of the nine regions are expected to have milder weather this week compared to normal and versus last year. The Pacific region is expected to have normal demand for all three energy types.

Home heating oil degree days in New England are expected to be 157, or 34 fewer than normal and 26 below last year. In the mid-Atlantic, which includes New York, the oil figure is forecast to be 130, or 43 fewer than normal and 17 below last year, according to the center.

Electricity-weighted heating is forecast to be 146 in New England, 37 below than normal and 29 fewer than last year. In the mid-Atlantic, it’s 129, or 45 fewer than normal and 18 below last year.

The heating degree day outlook for the U.S. as a whole is 74, 37 lower than normal and 19 below last year, according to the center.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

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