Rain Delays Start of Play at U.S. Open as Forecast Calls for Soggy Day

Rain delayed the start of today’s play at the U.S. Open and is forecast in the New York City area for much of the day, with four men’s fourth-round matches and two women’s quarterfinals scheduled.

“The current forecast calls for showers to continue for the next few hours followed by a period of dryness, when we hope to begin match play,” tournament organizers said in a statement on the event’s website.

Play was scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. with American Donald Young taking on Andy Murray, the No. 4 seed from Britain, in Arthur Ashe Stadium at the National Tennis Center in New York.

Rafael Nadal of Spain continues the defense of his U.S. Open title with the next match in Ashe Stadium. The No. 2 seed is set to face Gilles Muller of Luxembourg, while John Isner, the American No. 28 seed, is scheduled to play Gilles Simon, the No. 12 seed from France, in Louis Armstrong Stadium this afternoon.

Andy Roddick, the 21st-seeded American who won the U.S. Open in 2003, is scheduled to play David Ferrer, the No. 5 seed from Spain, tonight in Ashe Stadium for a spot in the quarterfinals.

An American man hasn’t reached the quarterfinals since 2008.

The women’s draw already has reached that round, with Flavia Pennetta, the No. 26 seed from Italy, scheduled to take on German Angelique Kerber, and Vera Zvonareva, the No. 2 seed from Russia, set to face Samantha Stosur, the No. 9 seed from Australia.

Photographer: Chris Trotman/Getty Images

Top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki won 12 of the last 14 games to pull out a 6-7 (6-8), 7-5, 6-1 victory last night at the National Tennis Center in New York. Close

Top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki won 12 of the last 14 games to pull out a 6-7 (6-8), 7-5,... Read More

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Photographer: Chris Trotman/Getty Images

Top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki won 12 of the last 14 games to pull out a 6-7 (6-8), 7-5, 6-1 victory last night at the National Tennis Center in New York.

Rain Forecast

There is a 75 percent chance of rain through the 1 p.m. hour, before a possible dry spell in the next couple of hours, according to Weather.com. The forecast increases to a 100 percent chance of rain at 7 p.m., when the evening matches are scheduled to begin.

Yesterday during the tennis season’s final Grand Slam event, Caroline Wozniacki fought back from a set down to beat former champion Svetlana Kuznetsova, while Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams also moved into the quarterfinals.

Top-seeded Wozniacki won 12 of the last 14 games to pull out a 6-7 (6-8), 7-5, 6-1 victory last night. The Dane trailed 4-1 in the second set before mounting her comeback at Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Wozniacki’s 3-hour, 2-minute win prevented Federer from starting play until 11:50 p.m. in New York, the latest start time for a men’s match in tournament history. Federer walked off the court at 1:12 a.m. after a 6-1, 6-2, 6-0 fourth-round win over Juan Monaco of Argentina.

Long Wait

“Waiting so long, it’s very important to get off to a great start,” Federer said in an interview with Australia’s Fox Sports. “I really tried to play aggressive and it all worked out until the very end. I never had to change my game plan.”

The third-seeded Swiss, a five-time champion at the season’s final Grand Slam tournament, next faces 11th-seeded Jo- Wilfried Tsonga of France for a spot in the semifinals. Tsonga ousted No. 8 Mardy Fish, the highest-seeded American in the men’s draw, with a 6-4, 6-7 (5-7), 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 victory.

Federer beat Tsonga in their first two matches this year and the Frenchman prevailed in their next two, in the round of 16 at the Rogers Cup in Montreal last month and in the quarterfinals of Wimbledon in June.

“I’ve really had some good matches with him,” Federer said. “Wimbledon was a tough one to lose, so I’m happy I get a chance to play him again.”

Williams, a three-time U.S. Open champion seeded 28th after two injury-marred years, won 6-3, 6-4 over 16th-seeded Ana Ivanovic of Serbia.

Top Seed

Djokovic, the men’s No. 1 seed, fought off four set points in a tiebreaker en route to a 7-6 (16-14), 6-4, 6-2 win against No. 22 Alexandr Dolgopolov from Ukraine.

While players dealt with winds that gusted up to 24 mph (39 kph) on Day 8, rain wasn’t a factor even though thunderstorms were in the forecast.

Wozniacki kept alive her hopes for a first Grand Slam title by rallying past No. 15 Kuznetsova, a Russian who won the 2004 U.S. Open and 2009 French Open. She also beat Kuznetsova in three sets in the fourth round of the 2009 U.S. Open.

“It definitely gives you confidence to pull this match out,” Wozniacki said at a news conference. “I could have been sitting here and been out already. I’m very proud of what I’ve achieved.”

Unforced Errors

Wozniacki finished with 26 unforced errors to 78 for Kuznetsova and advances to play 10th-seeded Andrea Petkovic of Germany, who won in straight sets over Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain. Williams’s next opponent is No. 17 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia, who upset the women’s seventh seed, Francesca Schiavone of Italy, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4.

Djokovic will face fellow Serb Janko Tipsarevic, the 20th seed who won in four sets against Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain.

“It’s a strange feeling,” Djokovic said of playing Tipsarevic. “You kind of forget about friendship and put that aside. We never played in a Grand Slam. We never played in a best-of-five against each other, so it’s going to be a first- time experience for both of us.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Mason Levinson at the National Tennis Center at mlevinson@bloomberg.net; Erik Matuszewski at the National Tennis Center at 8797 or matuszewski@bloomberg.net; Rob Gloster in New York at rgloster@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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