Mayors Urge End to Violence After Two Shot at 49ers-Raiders Preseason Game

The mayors of San Francisco and Oakland called for an end to violence at sporting events after two men were shot outside a National Football League preseason game in what police said were separate incidents.

One victim was in serious condition last night at San Francisco General Hospital after being shot several times in the stomach and another was recovering from less serious wounds following the Aug. 20 attacks in a parking lot outside San Francisco’s Candlestick Park, police said.

San Francisco Police Sergeant Mike Andraychak did not report any arrests and said yesterday that a motive for the attacks after the game between the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders was not known.

“Fans come to our stadiums to enjoy an afternoon of football, not to be subjected to intimidation or violence,” San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee and Oakland Mayor Jean Quan said in a statement posted yesterday on the City of San Francisco’s website. “These games are family events and the types of images we witnessed last night have no place in our arenas.”

The shootings came five months after San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow was left in a coma after being beaten March 31 by two men wearing Los Angeles Dodgers gear in the parking lot at Dodger Stadium on the opening day of the Major League Baseball season. Two men have pleaded not guilty to the attack.

The victims of the Candlestick Park attacks were found separately. Andraychak said in a voice mail left last night on his phone that the shootings were being investigated as separate incidents.

“Violence will not be tolerated in either of our stadiums,” the mayors added in their statement. The incidents “are completely unacceptable and will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Dex McLuskey in Dallas at dmcluskey@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net.

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