Tottenham Striker Robbie Keane to Join David Beckham at Los Angeles Galaxy

Robbie Keane will join Landon Donovan in the Los Angeles Galaxy strike force as the team chases a place in Major League Soccer’s postseason.

The Galaxy agreed to sign Ireland international captain Keane from English Premier League team Tottenham for an undisclosed sum. U.K. press reports said the transfer fee is about 3.5 million pounds ($5.7 million), while Sky Sports said Keane is joining on a two-year contract.

Keane, who has scored a national-record 51 goals in 108 appearances for Ireland, joins former England captain David Beckham, who’s in the final season of a five-year contract with the California club.

“When David Beckham came and trained at Spurs recently he couldn’t speak highly enough about the Galaxy, their fans and the league in general, so I can’t wait to get over and get started,” Keane said in a statement on the Galaxy’s website.

Los Angeles is first in the nine-team Western Conference with 15 regular-season games remaining. The Galaxy have 48 points from 25 games, five points more than second-place Dallas, which beat Los Angeles in the second round of the 2010 playoffs.

Keane will be added to the club’s roster once his visa comes through, the Galaxy said. He’ll play alongside the 29- year-old Donovan, the record scorer for the U.S. national team, who has 11 goals this season and 114 in his 11-year MLS career.

Keane, 31, joined Tottenham from Leeds in 2002 and was part of the 2008 League Cup-winning side. He was at Liverpool in 2008-09 before returning to Spurs and had loan spells at Scottish team Celtic and West Ham. He also played for Wolves, Coventry and Inter Milan earlier in his career.

To contact the reporter on this story: Dex McLuskey in Dallas at dmcluskey@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.