ATP, FX Energy, Monster Worldwide, Stifel: U.S. Equity Movers

Shares of the following companies had unusual moves in U.S. trading. Stock symbols are in parentheses and prices are as of 4 p.m. in New York.

Financial shares declined as the cost of insuring French debt rose to a record, signaling concern that Europe will fail to contain its sovereign-debt crisis. Bank of America Corp. (BAC US) slumped 11 percent to $6.77. JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) fell 5.6 percent to $34.37. Citigroup Inc. (C US) retreated 10 percent to $28.49. American Express Co. (AXP) sank 7.2 percent to $42.80.

Comerica Inc. (CMA) tumbled 9.6 percent to $24.22. Regions Financial Corp. (RF) decreased 12 percent to $4.23. SunTrust Banks Inc. (STI) slipped 11 percent to $17.69. Genworth Financial Inc. (GNW) erased 10 percent to $5.78. Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. (HIG) fell 11 percent to $18.15.

ATP Oil and Gas Corp. (ATPG US) advanced 6.9 percent to $8.82. Rodman & Renshaw LLC analyst Jeffrey P. Hayden, who rates the Gulf of Mexico petroleum and gas producer “market outperform,” said that concerns the company could file for bankruptcy protection are “overblown.”

BioLase Technology Inc. (BLTI US) rallied 20 percent to $3.33 for a two day gain of 46 percent. The medical-device maker said it plans to buy back as many as 2 million shares.

CME Group Inc. (CME) slipped 10 percent, the most since March 2009, to $239.21. The world’s largest futures exchange was removed by Deutsche Bank AG’s short-term buy list.

Computer Sciences Corp. (CSC) dropped 12 percent to $28.24 for the biggest retreat in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index. The provider of computer services to companies and U.S. government agencies reduced its forecast for full-year operating margin to as little as 7 percent, after previously projecting at least 8.75 percent.

Cree Inc. (CREE) jumped 16 percent, the most in the Russell 1000 Index, to $34.08. The maker of energy-efficient lighting posted fourth-quarter adjusted earnings that exceeded the average analyst projection, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

Federated Investors Inc. (FII) fell 8.4 percent to $16.91, the lowest price since March 2009. The investment management firm was removed Deutsche Bank AG’s short-term buy list. The Pittsburgh-based firm was also cut to “sell” from “hold” at Citigroup Inc. (C)

FX Energy Inc. (FXEN) slumped 19 percent, the most since August 2009, to $5.55. The Salt Lake City-based energy producer reported a second-quarter loss of 1 cent a share. The average analyst estimate was for a profit of 5 cents a share, according to a Bloomberg survey.

Intralinks Holdings Inc. (IL) plunged 45 percent, the most since it went public in August 2010, to $6.64. The software maker forecast third-quarter profit excluding some items of 13 cents a share at most, trailing the average analyst estimate of 15 cents in a Bloomberg survey.

KAR Auction Services Inc. (KAR) fell 16 percent, the most intraday since its initial public offering in December 2009, to $13.97. The provider of wholesale vehicle auction services reported second-quarter profit excluding some items of 32 cents a share, missing the average analyst estimate by 1 cent, according to Bloomberg data.

Monster Worldwide Inc. (MWW) lost 10 percent to $8.35, the lowest price since March 2009. Citigroup Inc. cut its rating on the online career recruiter to “hold” from “buy,” citing greater concern about the macroeconomic outlook, and increased competition.

OpenTable Inc. (OPEN US) gained 7.2 percent to $64.66 for the biggest gain since July 5. The online restaurant-reservation service was raised to “buy” from “hold” at Citigroup Inc. analyst Mark S. Mahaney, who cited an attractive valuation and the company’s prospects for growth and profitability.

Pegasystems Inc. (PEGA) rallied 14 percent, the most since Nov. 10, to $40.68. The developer of customer relationship management software reported second-quarter earnings that exceeded the average analyst projection, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

Primo Water Corp. (PRMW) plunged 61 percent to $5.40 for the biggest retreat in the Russell 2000 Index. The provider of bottled water and water dispensers forecast a third-quarter loss excluding some items of at least 3 cents a share. Analysts, on average, estimated the company would earn 8 cents a share, according to a Bloomberg survey.

Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. (RL) rose the most in the S&P 500, climbing 4.5 percent to $125.28. The clothing retailer reported first-quarter adjusted earnings of $1.90 a share, exceeding analysts’ estimate of $1.47 on average.

Stifel Financial Corp. (SF) fell 9.5 percent to $25.88, the lowest price since March 2009. The Securities and Exchange Commission sued the St. Louis-based financial-services company’s Stifel, Nicolaus & Co. unit for fraud, claiming it misled five Wisconsin school districts about the risks of complex investments that wiped out $200 million.

URS Corp. (URS) fell 9.3 percent to $31.70, the lowest price since March 2009. The design-and-engineering company reported second-quarter earnings excluding some items of 87 cents a share, trailing the average analyst estimate by 4.8 percent, according to a Bloomberg survey.

Versar Inc. (VSR) rallied 23 percent, the most since September 2009, to $2.95. The provider of environmental-testing and remediation services said it has been picked as the prime contractor for a task order of up to $45.4 million from the U.S. Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment.

Walt Disney Co. (DIS) slid 9.1 percent, the most since December 2008, to $31.54. The world’s biggest theme-park operator posted third-quarter studio revenue of $1.62 billion, compared with the average analyst estimate of $1.83 billion.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nikolaj Gammeltoft in New York at ngammeltoft@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael P. Regan at mregan12@bloomberg.net.

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