Apple Wins Order Against Samsung Tablet in EU

Apple Inc. (AAPL) won a temporary order that prevents Samsung Electronics Co. from distributing the Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer in the European Union, except the Netherlands.

A district court in Dusseldorf, Germany, granted the injunction, according to the dpa-AFX news service, citing unidentified people involved in the court negotiations. Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet confirmed the report today.

Samsung said it was given no notice of Apple’s request in a German court to temporarily prevent sales of the Galaxy tablet. The order was issued “without any hearing or presentation of evidence from Samsung,” Kim Titus, a spokesman for Samsung, said in a statement today.

Apple contends that Samsung’s Galaxy phones and tablet computer “slavishly copy” the iPhone and iPad. Apple is also seeking a court order to block sales in the U.S. until a trial can be held on patent-infringement claims there. In Australia, Samsung has agreed not to introduce a version of its Galaxy tablet computer until an Apple lawsuit there is resolved.

Samsung will “act immediately to defend our intellectual property rights through the ongoing legal proceedings in Germany and will continue to actively defend these rights throughout the world,” Titus said.

The Suwon, South Korean phonemaker will “take all necessary measures to ensure Samsung’s innovative mobile communications devices are available to customers in Europe and around the world,” he said.

Dispute Over Galaxy

The dispute began in April when Cupertino, California-based Apple sued Samsung in the U.S., claiming that the Galaxy products imitated Apple designs and technology. Samsung, which supplies memory chips for Apple, has retaliated with lawsuits in South Korea, Japan, Germany and the U.S.

“It’s no coincidence that Samsung’s latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging,” Huguet said, reiterating comments made by the company in April. “This kind of blatant copying is wrong, and we need to protect Apple’s intellectual property when companies steal our ideas.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.net; Ragnhild Kjetland in Frankfurt at rkjetland@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Kenneth Wong at kwong11@bloomberg.net; Allan Holmes at aholmes25@bloomberg.net

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