Boston Red Sox Get Aviles From Royals; Rockies Send Jimenez to Indians

The Boston Red Sox acquired infielder Mike Aviles from the Kansas City Royals as the Major League Baseball trade deadline approached today.

The Red Sox sent infielder/outfielder Yamaico Navarro and pitching prospect Kendal Volz to the Royals.

Aviles, 30, is hitting .222 with a .261 on-base percentage and five home runs in 185 at-bats.

“He’s a guy I think our organization has kind of liked afar for a while,” Red Sox manager Terry Francona said on the MLB website. “He came up, he was that guy that could really hit left-handers, actually both.”

Aviles was taken by the Royals in the seventh round of the First-Year Player draft in 2003.

Pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez, 27, who has thrown the only no- hitter in Colorado Rockies’ history, was traded to the Cleveland Indians for four prospects.

“The timing of this deal allowed us to maximize the value we were able to get in return,” Rockies General Manager Dan O’Dowd said in a statement.

The Indians will send pitchers Alex White and Joe Gardner and first baseman/outfielder Matt McBride to the Rockies immediately. Lefthander Drew Pomeranz can’t join Colorado until August, the one-year anniversary of his professional career.

Indians-Giants Swap

The Indians also sent 15-year veteran Orlando Cabrera, 36, to the San Francisco Giants in exchange for minor league outfielder Thomas Neal. Giants manager Bruce Bochy said Cabrera will become the team’s primary shortstop.

The Baltimore Orioles completed two deals, sending pitcher Koji Uehara to the Texas Rangers and first baseman Derrek Lee to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

The Rangers will send pitcher Tommy Hunter and first baseman Chris Davis to Baltimore.

“Koji is one of the most effective relievers in the game this year and the past couple of years,” Rangers General Manager Jon Daniels said. “He’s battle tested, he’s done it in the American League East, he’s a strike thrower and he has swing-and-miss stuff. We felt he was the right fit for the club.”

Uehara, 36, has pitched in 43 games for the Orioles and is 1-1 with a 1.72 earned run average while holding opponents to a .152 batting average. In 47 innings, he has allowed 25 hits and eight walks while striking out 62.

Baker for Lee

The Pirates are giving Class A first baseman Aaron Baker to the Orioles in exchange for Lee, 35, who has batted .309 with 11 extra-base hits and 16 runs batted in during the past 18 games.

The Atlanta Braves acquired center fielder Michael Bourn from the Houston Astros in exchange for outfielder Jordan Schafer and three minor league pitchers.

Two-time Gold Glove winner Bourn, 28, is hitting .303 and leads the majors with 39 stolen bases through July 30.

“This trade gives us the first true leadoff hitter we’ve had in a number of years,” Braves General Manager Frank Wren said on the team’s website.

The Detroit Tigers acquired pitcher Doug Fister and reliever David Pauley from the Seattle Mariners in exchange for four prospects.

Fister “gives us that solid guy to go out there, a six- or seven-inning-type guy that gives us a chance to win every time he takes the ball,” Tigers General Manager Dave Dombrowski said.

Marquis to Arizona

The Arizona Diamondbacks sent minor league shortstop Zach Walters to the Washington Nationals in exchange for pitcher Jason Marquis.

Marquis, 32, was 8-5 with a 3.95 ERA in 20 starts for the Nationals this year.

“He’s a guy that knows how to pitch, how to eat up innings and keep his team in the game,” infielder Willie Bloomquist said. “He’s a good sinkerball guy, which will fit well in our ballpark.”

The Milwaukee Brewers obtained utility fielder Jerry Hairston, 35, from the Nationals in a trade that sent outfielder Erik Komatsu to Washington.

Hairston is hitting .268 with a .342 on-base percentage and four home runs.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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