Mariners Lose 15th Straight Game Before MLB Series With Yankees

The Boston Red Sox sent the Seattle Mariners to a franchise-record 15th straight loss, collecting 17 hits in yesterday’s 12-8 win at Fenway Park.

Jarrod Saltalamacchia had three hits and drove in four runs for the Red Sox, while 44-year-old pitcher Tim Wakefield got his 199th career win.

The Mariners surpassed their longest previous losing streak of 14 games in 1992 to fall to 43-58 on the season. They have Major League Baseball’s longest skid since the 2005 Kansas City Royals lost 19 games in a row.

The Mariners now travel to New York for a three-game series against the Yankees starting today.

The Red Sox, after sweeping their three-game series with Seattle, have won 17 of their past 20 games and lead the Yankees by three games in the American League Eastern Division.

The Yankees beat the Oakland Athletics 7-5 yesterday as Curtis Granderson hit his 27th home run of the season.

Bartolo Colon allowed two runs over seven innings to pick up the win at Yankee Stadium and Mariano Rivera reached 25 saves for the 15th straight season, extended his major league record.

The Chicago Cubs beat the Houston Astros 5-4 in 10 innings yesterday to complete their first three-game sweep at Wrigley Field in almost two years. Chicago has won three games in a row for the first time this season.

The Florida Marlins rallied for two runs in the bottom of the eighth inning to beat the New York Mets 5-4 in Miami.

In other National League games, it was Philadelphia 5, San Diego 3; Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3 in 10 innings; San Francisco 2, Milwaukee 1; Los Angeles 3, Washington 1; Arizona 7, Colorado 0; and Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 3.

Elsewhere in the American League yesterday, it was the Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 2; the Los Angeles Angels 9, Baltimore 3; Tampa Bay 5, Kansas City 0; Detroit 5, Minnesota 2; and Toronto 3, Texas 0.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York, at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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