China, India Want Rich-Nation Emissions to Peak Before 2013

Brazil, China, India and other emerging nations said greenhouse-gas output from developed nations “should peak without any delay no later than 2012.”

Developed countries should cut emissions 50 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 under an extended Kyoto Protocol, the countries said in a submission yesterday to the United Nations- overseen climate talks in Bonn. “They should have peaked before 2000,” according to the document.

The submission highlights disagreement between emerging nations and developed countries in the climate-protection talks. The U.S. has said it’s unwilling to join an extended Kyoto Protocol unless emerging nations also participate.

Developing nations, including the African group, Argentina, Iran, Lebanon, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Uruguay said rich nations “shall not resort to any form of unilateral trade and other trade-related measures against goods and services from developing country parties on any grounds related to climate change.”

They also sought easier access to technology related to climate protection. “Specific and urgent measures shall be taken by developed country parties to enhance the development and transfer of technologies at different stages of the technology cycle covered by intellectual property rights to developing country parties.”

The emerging nations sought softer rules for themselves, partly because they have not contributed as much of the heat- trapping gases in the atmosphere.

“The time frame for peaking will be much longer in developing countries in order to ensure sufficient time for and equitable access to sustainable development, and bearing in mind that social and economic development and poverty eradication are the first and overriding priorities of developing countries.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Mathew Carr in London at m.carr@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Stephen Voss at sev@bloomberg.net

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