Domino’s, GM, J.C. Penney, Novellus, Ross, Timberland: U.S. Equity Movers

Shares of the following companies had unusual moves in U.S. trading. Stock symbols are in parentheses, and prices are as of 4 p.m. in New York.

Aeropostale Inc. (ARO) slumped 16 percent, the most in the Russell 1000 Index, to $21.29. The teen-clothing retailer forecast first-quarter profit of about 20 cents a share, below the average analyst estimate of 38 cents.

Career Education Corp. (CECO) jumped 7.4 percent, the most since Jan. 11, to $23.13. The operator of for-profit colleges posted first-quarter profit excluding some items of 90 cents a share, beating the 75-cent average analyst estimate.

Con-way Inc. (CNW) advanced 5.2 percent to $39.54, the highest price since May 2010. The biggest U.S. trucking company by sales reported first-quarter profit that topped analysts’ estimates as revenue at its freight division increased.

Domino’s Pizza Inc. (DPZ) gained 11 percent to $21.30, the highest price since May 2007. The pizza-delivery chain reported earnings excluding some items of 42 cents a share, beating the average analyst estimate by 22 percent.

Electronic Arts Inc. (ERTS) added 8.8 percent to $21.68, the highest price since August 2009. The second-largest U.S. video-game producer posted a fivefold gain in fourth-quarter profit, after the shooting title “Dead Space 2” helped sales surpass analysts’ estimates.

Gibraltar Industries Inc. (ROCK) rallied 21 percent, the most since November 2009, to $13.24. The maker of metal parts for buildings and cars posted first-quarter profit excluding some items of 8 cents a share, compared with an average loss estimate of 3 cents a share in a Bloomberg survey.

Global Industries Ltd. (GLBL) slipped 17 percent, the most since December 2008, to $7.27 after falling as much as 17 percent. The oilfield-construction company reported a first- quarter loss excluding some items of 30 cents a share, more than the 1-cent average loss estimate of analysts in a Bloomberg survey.

JDS Uniphase Corp. (JDSU) jumped 6.9 percent, the most since March 24, to $21.38. The maker of fiber-optic equipment forecast fourth-quarter revenue of as much as $475 million, more than the $469.1 million average analyst estimate.

Kendle International Inc. (KNDL) rose the most in the Russell 2000 Index, gaining 58 percent to $14.98. The researcher for drug and biotechnology companies was bought by INC Research LLC for $15.25 a share in cash.

Leap Wireless International Inc. (LEAP) jumped 9.8 percent to $16.54, the highest price since May 2010. The pay-as- you-go wireless carrier posted first-quarter earnings that indicated subscribers are spending more on mobile plans.

Men’s Wearhouse Inc. (MW) gained 15 percent to $32.04, the highest price since December 2007. The retailer of men’s suits and attire said that, excluding some items, it earned at least 47 cents a share in the first quarter, beating its previous forecast.

Murphy Oil Corp. (MUR) slumped 6.4 percent to $68.57 for the second-biggest loss in the S&P 500. The operator of gasoline-filling stations said second-quarter earnings will be as low as $1.50 a share, trailing the average estimate of $1.75 among analysts in a Bloomberg survey.

Novellus Systems Inc. (NVLS) rallied 7.6 percent, the most since Jan. 14, to $35.42. Tokyo Electron Ltd. may look to buy the San Jose, California-based semiconductor equipment maker after Applied Materials Inc. acquisition of Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates Inc., Citigroup Inc. and Credit Suisse Group AG analysts said.

ON Semiconductor Corp. (ONNN) rallied 7.2 percent, the most since May 2009, to $11.02. The maker of chips that help computers manage power forecast revenue in the second quarter to be at least $860 million, topping the average estimate of $855.1 million by analysts.

Pericom Semiconductor Corp. (PSEM) climbed 16 percent, the most since December 2008, to $10.32. The integrated circuits maker forecast revenue of at least $41.5 million in the current quarter, higher than the average analyst estimate of $40.6 million in a Bloomberg survey.

PMI Group Inc. (PMI) fell 13 percent to $1.75, the lowest price since July 2009. The third-largest U.S. mortgage insurer said losses may bring the firm out of compliance with regulatory standards by the end of June, which could limit sales.

Polypore International Inc. (PPO) climbed 19 percent, the third-most in the Russell 2000 Index, to $65.88. The maker of battery components reported first-quarter profit excluding some items of 55 cents a share, exceeding the average analyst estimate by 40 percent, Bloomberg data show.

Ross Stores Inc. (ROST) rose 6.9 percent to $78.55, the highest price since at least November 1985. The operator of apparel and home accessories stores said first-quarter profit was at least $1.47 a share excluding some items, above the $1.34 average of analyst estimates in a Bloomberg survey.

Savient Pharmaceuticals Inc. (SVNT) fell 23 percent to $8.57, the lowest price since June 2009. The East Brunswick, New Jersey-based biotechnology company reported first-quarter sales of $1.29 billion, trailing the average analyst estimate by 34 percent, Bloomberg data show.

Smith Micro Software Inc. (SMSI) tumbled 22 percent, the third-most in the Russell 2000, to $5.66. The communications- software provider for wireless carriers and phone makers forecast second-quarter sales of no more than $20 million, below the average analyst estimate of $24.1 million in a Bloomberg survey. The stock was downgraded to “hold” from “buy” at Needham & Co.

Timberland Co. (TBL) fell the most in the Russell 2000, sinking 26 percent to $30.65. The maker of outdoor clothing and footwear company said it earned 35 cents a share in the first quarter. That trailed the average analyst estimate of 59 cents in a Bloomberg survey.

To contact the reporters on this story: Lu Wang in New York at lwang8@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Nick Baker at nbaker7@bloomberg.net

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