Los Angeles Times, New York Times Lead Pulitzer Prizes With a Pair Apiece

The Los Angeles Times won Pulitzer Prizes for exposing corruption in a California city and for feature photography, sharing the lead in the annual journalism competition with the New York Times at two awards each.

Tribune Co.’s Los Angeles Times received the public-service prize for reporting on the outsized pay of officials in the city of Bell, resulting in arrests. The New York Times, owned by New York Times Co. (NYT), won for international reporting and commentary. Bloomberg News was a finalist in two categories, public service and national reporting.

ProPublica, an online, non-profit news organization started three years ago and led by former Wall Street Journal managing editor Paul Steiger, won for national reporting, after last year becoming the first Web-based outlet to get a prize. The 95th annual Pulitzer Prizes for excellence in reporting and the arts were announced today by Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in New York.

The Chicago Sun-Times got the local-reporting award for covering the violence in Chicago neighborhoods. Other winners included the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post.

No award was given in the breaking-news reporting category, with the organizers declining to provide specific reason for the omission. The last time the Pulitzer committee declined to give an award was in 2008 for editorial writing.

A committee of editors, publishers, writers and educators voted on the winners in 21 categories of journalism, letters, drama and music. Winners in all categories except public service receive a $10,000 cash award. The public-service prize, awarded to a news organization, is a gold medal.

Bell Corruption

The Los Angeles Times story on Bell helped bring charges to town officials over their compensation. City Manager Robert Rizzo and two other officials resigned July 22 after the newspaper reported that they earned a collective $1.6 million annually. Bell is a town of 38,000 south of Los Angeles in which almost one in six residents lives below the poverty line.

The newspaper’s Barbara Davidson received the photography award for her portrayal of the innocent victims of Los Angeles’s gang violence.

The New York Times received the international-reporting prize for its coverage of the failures of the Russian justice system. The newspaper’s David Leonhardt won the commentary award for discussing economic questions such as the federal-budget deficit and health-care reform.

Bloomberg News’s Daniel Golden, John Hechinger and John Lauerman were named finalists in the public-service category for revealing how some for-profit colleges exploit low-income students. Their colleague David Evans was a finalist in the national reporting category for a story that showed how life insurance companies were holding back death benefits owed to families of military veterans.

The following is a table of 2011 Pulitzer Prize winners.


JOURNALISM CATEGORIES

BREAKING NEWS REPORTING
No award

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
Paige St. John of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune

EXPLANATORY REPORTING
Mark Johnson, Kathleen Gallagher, Gary Porter, Lou Saldivar and
Alison Sherwood of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

NATIONAL REPORTING
Jesse Eisinger and Jake Bernstein of ProPublica

LOCAL REPORTING
Frank Main, Mark Konkol and John J. Kim of the Chicago Sun-Times

INTERNATIONAL REPORTING
Clifford J. Levy and Ellen Barry of the New York Times

FEATURE WRITING
Amy Ellis Nutt of the Newark Star-Ledger

COMMENTARY
David Leonhardt of the New York Times

CRITICISM
Sebastian Smee of the Boston Globe

EDITORIAL WRITING
Joseph Rago of The Wall Street Journal

EDITORIAL CARTOONING
Mike Keefe of The Denver Post

BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY
Carol Guzy, Nikki Kahn and Ricky Carioti of The Washington Post

FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
Barbara Davidson of the Los Angeles Times

PUBLIC SERVICE
The Los Angeles Times

LETTERS, DRAMA & MUSIC CATEGORY

FICTION
“A Visit from the Goon Squad” by Jennifer Egan

DRAMA
“Clybourne Park” by Bruce Norris

HISTORY
“The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery” by Eric
Foner

BIOGRAPHY
“Washington: A Life” by Ron Chernow

POETRY
“The Best of It: New and Selected Poems” by Kay Ryan

GENERAL NON-FICTION
“The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer” by
Siddhartha Mukherjee

MUSIC
Zhou Long for “Madame White Snake”

To contact the reporters on this story: Amy Thomson in New York at athomson6@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net

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