Missing King Tutankhamun Statue Returned to Egyptian Museum

A missing statue of King Tutankhamun has been returned to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, along with three other objects lost during the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak from power, an Egyptian minister said.

A small part of the crown on the gilded wooden statue of Tutankhamun standing on a boat is missing, as well as pieces of the legs, Zahi Hawass, minister of state for antiquities, said in an e-mailed statement today. The king will be reunited with the boat, which is still in the museum, and restored, he said.

Among the objects returned was a gilded bronze and wooden trumpet of Tutankhamun, which is in excellent condition and will be returned to its display immediately, Hawass said. A fan belonging to the king was also returned, though part of it has been broken into 11 pieces. A shabti statue of Yuya and Tjuya was also returned to the museum and will be placed on display again immediately.

The Egyptian Museum issued a final list in March of more than 50 ancient artifacts, including three gilded wooden statues of King Tutankhamun, which went missing after looters broke into the building in Cairo during anti-government protests in January.

To contact the reporter responsible for this story: Mahmoud Kassem in Cairo at mkassem1@bloomberg.net

Source: Egyptian Ministry of State for Antiquities via Bloomberg

A missing statue of King Tutankhamun. The item has been returned to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. It was taken during the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak from power. Close

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Source: Egyptian Ministry of State for Antiquities via Bloomberg

A missing statue of King Tutankhamun. The item has been returned to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. It was taken during the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak from power.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Riad Hamade at rhamade@bloomberg.net; Mark Beech at mbeech@bloomberg.net.

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