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China's `Rules' Will Fuel Ire in 2011, Eurasia's Bremmer Says: Tom Keene

China, the world’s second-largest economy, will stoke resentment in 2011 as its power grows while its willingness to engage in global affairs remains muted, according to Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group.

“They are growing like topsy, but they are doing it with their own sets of rules,” Bremmer, founder of the New York- based consulting firm, said in an interview on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg Surveillance” with Tom Keene. “The Chinese willingness to respond to international pressure just isn’t there. Their own priorities are very different, and their leverage is pretty great.”

The Chinese economy grew 10.1 percent last year, according to the median estimate of 18 economists in a Bloomberg survey. While the expansion will slow to 9 percent this year, that’s still more than three times the rate forecast for the U.S., another Bloomberg survey shows.

While China is stable economically and politically, “we should be concerned” because of the country’s scale, which will pose a risk for conflict globally, Bremmer said.

“China is going to increasingly become a very big challenge,” he said.

To contact the reporters on this story: Cordell Eddings in New York at ceddings@bloomberg.net; Tom Keene in New York at tkeene@bloomberg.net

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group. Close

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group.

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Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dave Liedtka at dliedtka@bloomberg.net

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