Colts Hold on to Beat Titans 30-28, End Three-Game Losing Skid in NFL

The Indianapolis Colts survived a fourth-quarter surge by the Tennessee Titans to snap a three- game losing skid in the National Football League.

Adam Vinatieri kicked two field goals in the fourth quarter to counter two touchdowns by Tennessee’s Bo Scaife as the Colts held out for a 30-28 win. Colts quarterback Peyton Manning passed for two touchdowns and no interceptions after throwing a career-record 11 interceptions in his past three games.

The win lifts the Colts to 7-6, a half-game behind the Jacksonville Jaguars, who lead the four-team American Football Conference South Division with a 7-5 record. Indianapolis hosts Jacksonville on Dec. 19.

“Hopefully we can sort of build off this win,” Manning told reporters. “This was a playoff game.”

Two touchdown passes from Manning to Pierre Garcon in the second quarter along with a 1-yard scoring run by Javarris James took the Colts to a 21-7 halftime lead at LP Field in Nashville.

Craig Stevens scored for the home team on a 7-yard pass from quarterback Kerry Collins in the third quarter and Vinatieri kicked a 21-yard field goal to make it 24-14 to Indianapolis at the start of the fourth quarter.

Vinatieri extended his team’s advantage to 13 points with a 28-yard field goal before Scaife scored on a 4-yard pass from Collins. Vinatieri then added three more points from 47 yards before Scaife completed the scoring as time expired on a 2-yard pass from Collins.

Manning completed 25 of 35 passes for 319 yards. It was his 63rd career 300-yard game, tying him with Dan Marino.

“This was a good overall team win,” Manning said in a televised interview. “Close game, the kind of game we expected.”

Collins completed 28 of 39 passes for 244 yards for the Titans (5-8).

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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