Clinton Says Cabinet Post Will Be Last Public Job, Won't Seek Presidency

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she won’t run for president once her tenure as the top U.S. diplomat ends, and instead will work on advocacy for women and children.

Clinton was speaking at a town hall meeting in Bahrain, where she’s attending a Gulf security summit hosted by Bahrain’s International Institute for Strategic Studies, where Yemen and Iran are expected to dominate the agenda.

“I think I’ll serve as secretary of state as my last public position, and then probably go back to advocacy work, particularly on behalf of women and children and particularly around the world,” Clinton, who will begin her third year in the position in January, said at a town hall meeting.

Clinton said she felt lucky because of her upbringing and education and that she “would like to continue working to improve lives for others as well.”

Clinton was defeated by Barack Obama for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008. There has been speculation that she might replace Robert Gates as secretary of defense.

Clinton, a graduate of Wellesley College, a women’s college, and Yale Law School, started her career at a non-profit advocacy group, the Children’s Defense Fund, “where I advocated and represented in court abused and neglected children,” Clinton said.

Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg

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Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she will not run for president once her tenure as the top U.S. diplomat ends, and instead will work on advocacy for women and children.

She has made the welfare of women and children a cornerstone policy during her time at the State Department, frequently raising the theme. She often meets with women’s groups during foreign travel.

While she is often asked about her plans after the State Department -- most recently last month -- this was the first time Clinton has discussed publicly alternatives to politics and government.

“If you look at what is still happening to women in many parts of the world, it is tragic and terrible,” Clinton said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nicole Gaouette in Manama, Bahrain at ngaouette@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Silva at msilva34@bloomberg.net

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