Breaking News

Tweet TWEET

Bristol Palin Survives `Dancing' Elimination Round With Help of Tea Party

Bristol Palin survived another elimination round on ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” as fans including Tea Party supporters mustered enough votes to overcome low scores from the talent show’s judges.

Palin, the daughter of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, will return for the ninth week of the Walt Disney Co. network’s show, after her tango with partner Mark Ballas tied for the judges’ worst score. Former NFL quarterback Kurt Warner was eliminated yesterday, based on the lowest combined tally.

“There’s a strong popular movement behind Sarah Palin at the moment and she’s receiving a lot of support from the Tea Party,” Conrad Green, executive producer of the program, said in a Nov. 4 interview. “It’s entirely possible some of those people are behind Bristol for political reasons.”

During the taping of the Nov. 8 show, the 20-year-old Palin wore a Tea Party t-shirt while rehearsing.

“Dancing With the Stars,” TV’s most-watched show this season, pairs celebrities with professional dancers in weekly elimination rounds that weigh the public’s votes and judges’ scores equally. The program, airing Monday and Tuesday nights in the U.S., consists of a performance night and a results night. The format allows weaker participants with more fans to advance.

Palin’s second dance, an “instant” samba -- a new twist in which contestants get their music just before hitting the dance floor -- landed the couple at the bottom of the leader board.

“My biggest fear for the samba is getting off beat, because once you’re off beat you’re screwed,” Palin said during rehearsals.

Contestants, now down to four, include singer Brandy Norwood, actress Jennifer Grey and Disney Channel star Kyle Massey.

To contact the reporters on this story: Ronald Grover in Los Angeles at Rgrover5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.