Steinbrenner, Martin Lead Baseball Hall of Fame Veterans Committee Ballot

George Steinbrenner and Billy Martin, linked through repeated hirings and firings as owner and manager of the New York Yankees, headline a 12-candidate veterans committee ballot for the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Steinbrenner, who died in July, and Martin, a five-time manager of the Yankees and a former second baseman for the team, are joined by 10 former Major League Baseball players, managers and executives whose most significant contribution to the game came during the expansion era that began in 1973, the Hall of Fame said today in a statement.

The candidates will be voted on by a 16-member panel during baseball’s winter meetings next month, with the results released Dec. 6. Any candidate who receives votes on 75 percent of the 16 ballots will be inducted with the 2011 class.

Steinbrenner owned the Yankees from 1973 until his death from a heart attack in July. In his 37 years as owner, the team won 11 pennants and seven World Series titles. Martin, who died in 1989, managed the Yankees for parts of eight seasons, winning the World Series in 1977. In his 16 seasons as manager of the Yankees, Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, Texas Rangers and Oakland Athletics, Martin was 1,253-1,013, with two American League pennants and a World Series title.

Other candidates include former players union leader Marvin Miller, former New York Mets outfielder Rusty Staub, and Yankees pitcher Ron Guidry, who won World Series titles in 1977 and 1978.

The veterans committee operates on a three-year cycle, considering long-retired players, managers and executives from three different eras for induction into the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. The committee will vote on Golden Era (1947-72) candidates in 2011 and Pre-Integration Era (1871-1946) candidates in 2012. Expansion Era candidates will be eligible again in 2013.

To contact the reporter on this story: Eben Novy-Williams in New York enovywilliam@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net.

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