Cain, Giants Beat Rangers 9-0, Take Two-Game World Series Lead

The San Francisco Giants won Game 1 of the World Series with 14 hits. They took Game 2 with shutout pitching.

With the best-of-seven series heading to Texas, the Rangers are down 2-0 and -- after getting outscored 20-7 in San Francisco -- still haven’t won a World Series game in the franchise’s 50-year history.

Matt Cain and two relievers combined on a four-hitter and Edgar Renteria drove in three runs to lead the Giants to a 9-0 win last night at AT&T Park in San Francisco. The Giants scored seven runs in the final inning.

“We’ve put ourselves in a good situation,” Cain said in a news conference. “We’ve just got to take that confidence and some of the good approaches that we’ve had in these last two games and take them down to Texas with us.”

A team has taken a 2-0 lead in 51 of the previous 105 World Series, and has gone on to win the championship in 40 of those years -- a 78 percent success rate.

Game 3 is scheduled for tomorrow night at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. Colby Lewis is set to start for the Rangers against San Francisco’s Jonathan Sanchez.

The games in San Francisco contrasted starkly. In Game 1, the Giants won 11-7 in a contest that included 25 hits and six errors. There were 12 hits and no errors last night.

“There’s still a lot of baseball left to be played,” Rangers manager Ron Washington said in a news conference. “We certainly don’t feel like we’re defeated. We’re heading home. They took care of us in their ballpark, now we’re headed to ours.”

Cain’s Scoreless Innings

Cain threw 7 2/3 shutout innings in Game 2 and hasn’t allowed an earned run in 21 1/3 innings in three starts this postseason. He’s the fourth pitcher in Major League Baseball history to not allow an earned run in his first three postseason starts, and the first since Jon Matlack of the New York Mets in 1973. The other two pitchers are Hall of Famers Christy Mathewson of the New York Giants in 1905 and Waite Hoyt of the New York Yankees in 1921.

Cain outpitched the Rangers’ C.J. Wilson, a left-hander who allowed two runs on three hits before leaving the game in the seventh inning with a blister on the middle finger of his pitching hand.

“It was a tight game going into the eighth inning,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said in a news conference. “The big inning certainly helped.”

The Giants are seeking their first World Series title since 1954, when they were based in New York. The Rangers, playing in the World Series for the first time, have never won in 11 games at AT&T Park and haven’t defeated the Giants in nine games overall dating to 2001.

Renteria Breaks Deadlock

Cain and Wilson traded scoreless innings until Renteria hit a solo home run about seven rows deep into the left-field stands with one out in the fifth inning. The Giants added their second run on Juan Uribe’s run-scoring single in the seventh.

The Rangers had only one baserunner in the first four innings. Ian Kinsler hit a double high off the center-field wall leading off the fifth and was stranded at second base.

The Rangers threatened to score in the sixth, when Michael Young and Josh Hamilton had consecutive one-out singles and advanced on a wild pitch. The potential rally fizzled when Nelson Cruz fouled out and Kinsler flied to right.

The Giants added seven runs in the eighth inning on a two- out single by Buster Posey, four straight walks, a two-run single by Renteria, a two-run triple by pinch-hitter Aaron Rowand and a run-scoring double by Andres Torres.

Elvis Andrus and Cruz were held hitless for the Rangers, the first time in 13 postseason games either had failed to get at least one hit.

“You have to tip your hat to the pitching over there,” Washington said. “Those guys were good, especially Cain.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Rob Gloster at AT&T Park in San Francisco at 1397 or rgloster@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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