Nojima, Ray, TonenGeneral, SBI Holdings, Shinsei, TV Asahi: Japan Stocks

Japan’s Nikkei 225 Stock Average fell 23.17, or 0.3 percent, to 9,381.06 as of the close in Tokyo. The following were among the most active shares in the Japanese market today. Stock symbols are in parentheses after company names.

Banks: Mizuho Financial Group Inc. (8411 JT) led banks lower after a Swiss government-appointed panel said UBS AG (UBSN VX) and Credit Suisse Group AG (CSGN VX) need to hold almost double the capital required under Basel III. Mizuho tumbled 5.9 percent to 112 yen, the lowest since Aug. 2003. Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc. (8306 JT) slid 2.6 percent to 382 yen and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc. (8316 JT) sank 2.9 percent to 2,378 yen.

Fujita Kanko Inc. (9722 JT), an operator of hotels, restaurants and resort facilities, slid 2.2 percent to 362 yen. The company said it had a 547 million yen ($6.6 million) charge in the third quarter because of the devaluation of securities.

Kuraudia Co. (3607 JT), a bridal attire maker, soared 13 percent to 1,219 yen, rising the most since July 2009. The company said it will repurchase up to 4.1 percent of its outstanding shares.

Leopalace21 Corp. (8848 JT), a real estate company, plunged 8.6 percent to 127 yen. The company said it will book a non- operating charge of about 2.7 billion yen in the second quarter due to costs incurred from the stronger yen.

Megane Top Co. (7541 JT), an eyeglass retailer, leapt 4.4 percent to 809 yen. The company said same-store sales in September jumped 7.3 percent from a year earlier.

Nojima Corp. (7419 JQ), an operator of electronics shops, jumped 5.2 percent to 605 yen. The company offered to acquire the Yokohama Bay Stars baseball team from Tokyo Broadcasting System Holdings Inc. (9401 JT), the Asahi newspaper reported, citing Nojima President Hiroshi Nojima. Tokyo Broadcasting fell 1.1 percent to 1,048 yen.

Omron Corp. (6645 JO), a maker of electronic components, rallied 4.3 percent to 1,940 yen. The company was boosted to “outperform” from “neutral” by Shuichi Ide, an analyst at Mizuho Securities Co.

Ray Corp. (4317 JQ), a digital graphics production company, surged 22 percent to 138 yen, the highest since July 2008, after saying in a preliminary earnings statement that first-half net income amounted to 78 million yen, beating its profit outlook of 10 million yen.

Ricoh Co. (7752 JT), a maker of office equipment, gained 2.9 percent to 1,218 yen. The company was raised to “outperform” from “neutral” by Kunihiko Kanno, a Tokyo-based analyst at Credit Suisse Group.

SBI Holdings Inc. (8473 JT), a venture-capital and financial-services company, plummeted 8.8 percent to 9,370 yen, the lowest since March 2009. SBI said it purchased rights to 6.6 billion yen in loans made by failed Japanese consumer lender Takefuji Corp. (8564 JT). SBI made the purchase on Sept. 21, according to a release on the company’s website. Takefuji lost 40 percent to 3 yen.

TonenGeneral Sekiyu K.K. (5012 JT), a unit of Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM US), sank 6.3 percent to 711 yen, the lowest since March 2003. Exxon said it may sell part of its Japanese gasoline retailing operations.

TV Asahi Corp. (9409 JT), a broadcaster, rose 1.9 percent to 110,400 yen. The company raised its full-year net income forecast 20 percent to 5.5 billion yen, citing a recovery in the television advertising market.

Uny Co. (8270 JT), a department-store chain, advanced 2 percent to 676 yen. The company posted net income of 3.21 billion yen in the six months to Aug. 20, compared with a loss of 2.64 billion yen a year earlier, buoyed by cost cuts.

To contact the reporters on this story: Norie Kuboyama in Tokyo at nkuboyama@bloomberg.net; Akiko Ikeda in Tokyo at iakiko@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Darren Boey at dboey@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.