New York Brits, Ozzy Yells, ‘Bedlam’ Premiere: London Weekend

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Photographer: Keith Pattison/Shakespeare's Globe via Bloomberg

Patrick Brennan, Rose Leslie and Sophie Duval in "Bedlam." The play, running through Oct. 1, is the first by a woman to be staged at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

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Photographer: Keith Pattison/Shakespeare's Globe via Bloomberg

Patrick Brennan, Rose Leslie and Sophie Duval in "Bedlam." The play, running through Oct. 1, is the first by a woman to be staged at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. Close

Patrick Brennan, Rose Leslie and Sophie Duval in "Bedlam." The play, running through Oct. 1, is the first by a woman... Read More

Photographer: Jason Bell/National Portrait Gallery via Bloomberg

Zoe Heller in New York. The photo is part of an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery of Britons who have settled in New York. Photographer Jason Bell's pictures regularly appear in Vogue and Vanity Fair. Close

Zoe Heller in New York. The photo is part of an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery of Britons who have... Read More

Photographer: Jason Bell/National Portrait Gallery via Bloomberg

Sting in New York. The photo is part of an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery of Britons who have settled in New York. The show, by fellow British exile Jason Bell, ends April 17. Close

Sting in New York. The photo is part of an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery of Britons who have settled in... Read More

Source: Grand Central Publishing/ Hachette Book Group via Bloomberg

Ozzy Osbourne, the rock singer, cools down after a concert in this undated photograph released to mark the publication of his autobiography. Close

Ozzy Osbourne, the rock singer, cools down after a concert in this undated photograph released to mark the... Read More

New York City is home to 120,000 Britons -- more than you might expect -- and a few famous ones are now the toast of a London exhibition.

Sting, historian Simon Schama, author Zoe Heller and Metropolitan Museum of Art Director Thomas P. Campbell have their mug shots on display temporarily in the National Portrait Gallery. The photographer is another exile: Jason Bell got his first camera aged 5, and is a Vogue and Vanity Fair regular.

“An Englishman in New York: Photographs by Jason Bell” runs through April 17, 2011, and on Fridays stays open until 9 p.m. Information: http://www.npg.org.uk or +44-20-7306-0055.

Saturday

An 18th-century madhouse is the messy backdrop to the first-ever staging at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre of a play written by a woman.

“Bedlam,” penned by Nell Leyshon and directed by Jessica Swale, is set in an insane asylum where a lewd, gin-drinking doctor abuses his female inmates and, for a penny a pop, shows them off to visiting voyeurs.

When a nice country girl and a more compassionate governor appear, the tide starts to turn.

“Bedlam,” which is based on a real-life 18th-century mental institution and gets its world premiere at the Globe, ends Oct. 1. Information: http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/ or call +44-20-7401-9919.

Saturday Night

Ozzy Osbourne is bringing his festival of hard rock to the U.K. for the first time in five years. The Ozzfest at the O2 Arena on Saturday will see Steel Panther and Korn warm up.

The 61-year-old singer himself promises plenty of pyrotechnics and blood-curling screams as he narrates his path to fame -- before the reality-TV appearances, addictions and bat biting. Though he is promoting his new CD “Scream,” he’ll perform plenty of classics, including “Paranoid.”

Information: http://www.ozzy.com/us/home.

Another Option

Why didn’t the English National Opera think of hiring Ozzy for the new “Faust” production? The old Goth would feel so at home in this weepy medieval epic about a lusty oldster and his devil pal. Instead, we get yet another theater director, Des McAnuff of “Jersey Boys,” as the company struggles to be cool.

“Faust” is in repertory through Oct. 16. Information: http://www.eno.org.

Sunday

The Imperial War Museum is showing the carcass of a vehicle that blew up 3 1/2 years ago in a historic Baghdad book market, leaving 38 people dead.

“Baghdad, 5 March 2007” is artist Jeremy Deller’s way of remembering civilian victims, who now make up 90 percent of all casualties in conflict, versus 10 percent a century ago.

The bombed-out car was donated to the London institution by the New Museum, New York, and a book is being published about its grim trajectory. You can see the vehicle in the war museum’s atrium, sitting amid an intimidating array of military hardware.

Information: http://www.iwm.org.uk or +44-20-7416-5320.

Restaurant Picks

Zagat, the New York restaurant guide, this week turned its attention to London, listing the U.K. capital’s finest places to eat. The Ledbury (http://www.theledbury.com/) took top place for food.

Galvin La Chapelle (http://www.galvinrestaurants.com) was best newcomer, and Chilango (http://www.chilango.co.uk/) won for value.

(Farah Nayeri writes for Muse, the arts and leisure section of Bloomberg News. The opinions expressed are her own.)

To contact the writer on the story: Farah Nayeri in London at farahn@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Beech at mbeech@bloomberg.net.

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