Santana Moss Said to Get HGH From Accused Canadian Doctor: Washington Post

 
Santana Moss Received HGH From Accused Canadian Doctor, Source
Says

By Rick Maese and Barry Svrluga
     May 20 (Washington Post) -- Washington Redskins' receiver
Santana Moss was among the professional athletes who received
human growth hormone from Canadian doctor Anthony Galea,
according to a source familiar with the investigation. On
Tuesday, Galea was charged with smuggling and distributing HGH.
     Moss would not discuss the matter at Redskins Park on
Wednesday.
     "I'll talk about football. I don't know about nothing else,"
Moss said. "I ain't got nothing to do with nothing that ain't
about me."
     Moss's name was first reported today by the Buffalo News.
The newspaper, which cited unidentified sources close to the case
in its report, said that at this point federal prosecutors do not
intend to file criminal charges against Moss or any other athlete
with connections to the doctor.
     Redskins senior vice president Tony Wyllie said, "This is an
off-the-field matter. I'm going to refer all questions to his
agent, Drew Rosenhaus."
     Rosenhaus did not immediately return messages seeking
comment.
     NFL spokesman Greg Aiello issued a statement Tuesday saying
the NFL did not know the identities of any of the players listed
in the criminal complaint filed Tuesday by the U.S. Attorney's
Office.
     Human growth hormone is among the banned substances in the
NFL. Though the league doesn't specifically test for it, players
are still subject to punishment if they're known to be in
violation of the league's drug policy.
     The Redskins concluded their first set of organized team
activities Wednesday at Redskins Park and Moss was asked to
address the subject afterward.
     Moss, who is sitting out much of the Redskins' offseason
work so that he can rehabilitate his left knee after minor
surgery, said he wouldn't comment on whether he had ever met or
been treated by the doctor.
     "I'm telling you right now, I'm talking about football,"
Moss said. "You talk about football. Anything else out of that,
no."
     Redskins Coach Mike Shanahan said Wednesday the team has not
been contacted regarding the federal investigation.
     "We'll let the due process take care of itself," Shanahan
said. "But I'm not going to answer to every type of question that
comes -- some doctor comes to town and supposedly is seeing a
player. The NFL is on top of all those things. If there's any
validity to it, they will contact me and contact our
organization, which they have not done."
     The complaint Tuesday did not reveal the names of the
players who were involved in the case. According to the
complaint, Galea's medical assistant Mary Anne Catalano was on
her way to Washington to meet Galea and an NFL player on Sept.
14, 2009, when she was arrested at the U.S.-Canada border with
banned substances, syringes and other medical equipment in her
vehicle. The Buffalo News reported that the player was Moss.
     Earlier this month, when he sat out of a team minicamp, Moss
said he had been dealing with knee problems for three years and
had finally decided to deal with them surgically. Though he has
played in all 16 games in each of the last two seasons, he missed
two games each in 2006 and 2007, and he occasionally missed
practice time because of knee problems during that time.
     "I had some stuff that was bothering me from years before,
and I just decided to get it done," Moss said of the surgery.
     Moss, who turns 31 next month, has played nine NFL seasons,
the last five with the Redskins. He has 500 catches for 7,443
yards and 46 touchdowns, and is coming off his second straight
season with at least 70 receptions. He is expected to be
recovered from his injury in time for the team's June minicamp.
     "I ain't bothering nobody," he said Wednesday. "I'm
rehabbing. Getting better."
     Redskins Coach Mike Shanahan said Wednesday the team has not
been contacted regarding the federal investigation.
     "We'll let the due process take care of itself," Shanahan
said. "But I'm not going to answer to every type of question that
comes -- some doctor comes to town and supposedly is seeing a
player. The NFL is on top of all those things. If there's any
validity to it, they will contact me and contact our
organization, which they have not done."
     Galea was charged Tuesday with, among other things,
illegally bringing human growth hormone over the border on
several trips to treat professional baseball and football players
as well as golfers. Most Redskins players and coaches insisted
Tuesday, following an offseason workout, that they weren't aware
of the player's identity.
     "We really don't know," linebacker Andre Carter said. "But
if that day does come up, and they discuss who the suspect is,
we'll plan accordingly. But regardless, if he did or didn't make
that mistake, he's still family. We won't turn our backs on him.
We just got to go along with it."
     The issue dominated discussion during the first of four
sessions of "organized team activities," which concluded
Wednesday. When news broke that a Redskin was involved in the
investigation on Tuesday, players' cell phones began lighting up
with text messages. Some said it could affect preparations for
Shanahan's first season as head coach -- particularly if the
player is suspended by the NFL.
     "It's kind of disappointing, as far as that whole deal
goes," receiver Malcolm Kelly said. "A lot of people are accused
of doing it all the time. To come out now when we're out trying
to get everything together, it's just another distraction."
     Several Redskins also acknowledged the pressure NFL players
are under to overcome injuries and return to the field. But
veteran defensive end Phillip Daniels -- who has endured several
injuries during a 13-year career -- said a player who knowingly
used HGH could be viewed differently in the locker room.
     "There's no excuse," Daniels said. "Every guy knows that we
can't use that. Every guy knows that. You know if you're using
it, that ain't a good thing.
     "Any other supplement that you use -- I can see something
over the counter, that you bought at the store, you get tested
and you come up positive. That's different. You didn't know it
was in there. But HGH, you know what that is. You know what that
is. There's really no excuse."
     Daniels said he frequently calls an information line
established by the NFL Players Association -- sometimes for
himself, sometimes on behalf of teammates -- to ask questions
about supplements players are considering taking. "Even if you
call it in, they tell you you're still responsible for what you
put in your body," Daniels said.
     It is not, though, unusual for players to seek treatment
outside of the team's staff, be it for physical conditioning or
treatment of injuries.
     "I've had guys who've had five or six people work on them
all the time -- massages, their own workout people," Shanahan
said. "Everybody's a little bit different with how they take care
of their body."
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