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Yahoo, Google Finance Websites Suffer Slowdowns After Stock Markets Dive

Yahoo! Inc., Google Inc. and at least one brokerage sustained slowdowns on Web pages that provide financial information as U.S. stocks tumbled and users swarmed the Internet for market updates.

Yahoo! Finance “experienced intermittent issues related to traffic from the today’s market activity,” the company said in an e-mailed statement. Yahoo said it will continue to monitor and resolve the issue as necessary.

Information systems were taxed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 347.8 points, or 3.2 percent, to 10,520.32 today on concern the debt crisis in Europe will hinder the global economic recovery. Earlier in the session, the Dow plunged almost 1,000 points, or 9.2 percent, the biggest percentage drop since 1987.

Google, in an e-mailed statement, said a small percentage of users experienced some sluggishness loading Google Finance for a short period, though the service remained up and running throughout. Bloomberg LP’s website also provides financial information to consumers. Judith Czelusniak, a spokeswoman for Bloomberg, didn’t respond to requests for comment after regular business hours.

The market turmoil affected at least one investor website.

Charles Schwab Corp. experienced extra traffic at its site, phone service centers and branches, particularly between about 2:50 p.m. and 3:57 p.m. New York time, when the market decline accelerated, Greg Gable, a spokesman for the San Francisco-based company, said in an e-mailed statement.

“Because of the high volume, some clients may have experienced intermittent access on schwab.com and longer wait times on the phone; but the website and phones were in operation handling millions of trades and inquiries,” Gable said. “We anticipate an extremely active day on the markets tomorrow and have put all hands on deck in preparation.”

On E-Trade Financial Corp.’s website, it was “business as usual,” with traders having normal access to the service, said Tina Martineau, a spokeswoman for New York-based E-Trade.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian Womack in San Francisco at Bwomack1@bloomberg.net

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