Virginia Lacrosse Player Hit Victim's Head Against Wall, Affidavit Says

A University of Virginia lacrosse player accused of murdering his ex-girlfriend told police that he repeatedly hit her head against a wall during a fight, according to an affidavit.

George Huguely, 22, of Chevy Chase, Maryland, was charged yesterday with killing Yeardley Love, 22, a fellow student at Virginia and a member of the women’s lacrosse team.

Huguely told police investigators that he entered Love’s apartment through an unlocked front door and then kicked open the door to her bedroom, where police found the woman’s body, her bruised face lying in a pool of blood. In the affidavit filed in Charlottesville, Virginia, Circuit Court and released today, Huguely said the two had an altercation during which he “shook Love and her head repeatedly hit the wall.”

Huguely’s Charlottesville-based lawyer, Fran Lawrence, said earlier today that Love’s death was unintentional.

“Until more information becomes available, it is our hope that no conclusions will be drawn, or judgments made about George or this case,” Lawrence told reporters following a scheduled bond hearing at the District Court in Charlottesville. “We are confident that Ms. Love’s death was not intended but an accident with a tragic outcome.”

The bond hearing was delayed and Huguely, a reserve midfielder for Virginia’s top-ranked men’s team, will remain at Albermarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail.

Lawrence also said Huguely would withdraw from school.

Hearing Rescheduled

Huguely appeared at today’s court session by a video link from the jail. The Washington Post said his only comment was to thank the judge at the end of the hearing.

A status hearing has been scheduled for June 10.

Charlottesville Police went to an off-campus apartment at 2:15 a.m. yesterday to investigate a possible alcohol overdose.

Witnesses described finding Love face-down on her pillow, with her head in a pool of blood, according to the affidavit. The right side of her face was bruised, her right eye was swollen shut and her chin was bruised and scraped.

Autopsy results have yet to be released.

The Washington Post reported today that in 2008, Huguely was tasered and handcuffed after he threatened and fought a police officer during an alcohol-related incident outside a fraternity house near Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.

Huguely, who was visiting friends, was charged with public swearing, intoxication and resisting arrest, the Post said, citing Lexington Police Patrolwoman R.L. Moff.

No. 1-Ranked Team

Virginia, which has a 14-1 record and No. 1 ranking, is preparing for the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament as Atlantic Coast Conference champion. The Cavaliers would likely host a first-round NCAA game on May 16.

The women’s team, ranked fifth with a 13-5 mark, may also be selected to participate in the NCAA lacrosse tournament.

Athletic Director Craig Littlepage said the teams would compete in the tournaments.

“A part of their healing will be getting our students back into some of their routines,” Littlepage said in an e-mail. “Our lacrosse teams will honor Yeardley by continuing their seasons. We anticipate both teams will be selected for the NCAA tournaments and they will represent the University of Virginia as they always have.”

Huguely, a senior, appeared in all 15 games as a reserve for the Cavaliers, scoring four goals and three assists. He had a goal and an assist in Virginia’s lone loss this season, a 13-9 home setback against ACC rival Duke University on April 17.

Love, a senior, played defense and started three games for the women’s team.

“The kids on the two lacrosse teams have kind of expressed that they’re not in a situation right now where they want to do interviews,” Virginia information director Jim Daves said. “Right now, it’s too close to the situation and they don’t feel comfortable talking about it.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net; Curtis Eichelberger in Charlottesville, Virginia, or at ceichelberge@bloomberg.net

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.