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Businessweek Archives

The Top 20 For Executive Mb As


Special Report

THE TOP 20 FOR EXECUTIVE MBAs

A glance at BUSINESS WEEK's report card on executive MBA programs will raise one obvious question: What happened to such high-powered B-schools as Harvard, Stanford, and Dartmouth?

The simple answer: They don't offer executive MBA programs. Their conspicuous absence allows the emergence of a group of well-regarded B-schools that fail to make most top-20 lists of full-time MBA programs. There's Georgia State University in Atlanta, for instance, and Tulane University in New Orleans. Most of these schools run programs that fit the classic definition of an executive MBA program: two years of study for managers with 10 or more years of work experience. Most students are sponsored by their companies, which pay the steep tuition bills and allow days off from work to attend class.

These programs are quite different from the more common evening MBA offerings, which are usually populated by younger people seeking the degree at their own expense. In so-called EMBA programs, classes typically meet once a week on alternating Fridays and Saturdays. Exceptions include Wharton, which requires a Friday night sleep-over every other week, when classes meet on both Friday and Saturday. Many feature international business trips and weeks of intensive study in residence on campus.

For BW's report-card grades, the top 20% of the schools in each category received As. The next 25% got Bs, while the next 30% received Cs. The remaining schools got Ds. For more detail on the ranking, see page 114. A glance at BUSINESS WEEK's report card on executive MBA programs will raise one obvious question: What happened to such high-powered B-schools as Harvard, Stanford, and Dartmouth?

The simple answer: They don't offer executive MBA programs. Their conspicuous absence allows the emergence of a group of well-regarded B-schools that fail to make most top-20 lists of full-time MBA programs. There's Georgia State University in Atlanta, for instance, and Tulane University in New Orleans. Most of these schools run programs that fit the classic definition of an executive MBA program: two years of study for managers with 10 or more years of work experience. Most students are sponsored by their companies, which pay the steep tuition bills and allow days off from work to attend class.

These programs are quite different from the more common evening MBA offerings, which are usually populated by younger people seeking the degree at their own expense. In so-called EMBA programs, classes typically meet once a week on alternating Fridays and Saturdays. Exceptions include Wharton, which requires a Friday night sleep-over every other week, when classes meet on both Friday and Saturday. Many feature international business trips and weeks ofintensive study in residence on campus.

For BW's report-card grades, the top 20% of the schools in each category received As. The next 25% got Bs, while the next 30% received Cs. The remaining schools got Ds. For more detail on the ranking, see page 114.


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