Businessweek

Qatar Air Relaxes Grip on Flight Attendants as Carrier Grows Up

It’s 10 a.m. in Doha and more than 200 Qatar Airways flight attendants are gathered in an airport hotel ballroom. Taking the microphone, one woman fires off a query about a policy barring cabin crew from using their mobile phones in public while in uniform, garnering murmurs of approval. Another asks why those living in company-owned housing must be in their rooms from 4 a.m. to 7 a.m., getting a round of applause.

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The Fall of New York City's Taxi King

Evgeny "Gene" Freidman is known as the Taxi King. He is the largest medallion operator in the country, but has recently run into trouble from shrinking medallion values and ridesharing services like Uber eating into his business. (Video by Drew Beebe, Victoria Blackburne-Daniell) (Source: Bloomberg)

Are Diamonds Losing Their Sparkle?

Diamond producers are under pressure to cut supply and lower prices as traders, cutters and polishers struggle to turn a profit amid a squeeze on credit and languishing jewellery sales. Sophia Hirsh , Joint Managing Director of fine jewellery brand Hirsh London offers her insight to Bloomberg’s Manus Cranny and Francine Lacqua on “The Pulse.”

China Data Signals Further Decline in Growth Prospects

Chinese stock traders put the government’s market rescue to the test, sending the Shanghai Composite Index to within one point of its low during the depths of a $4 trillion selloff last month. With data Friday showing the manufacturing sector is at the weakest since the global financial crisis, investors are trying to gauge how far state-linked funds will go to prop up share prices.

32 Weird Animals for Sale at the World's Largest Pet Shop

Zoo Zajac is, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, the biggest pet shop in the world, housing approximately 250,000 individual animals of 3,000 different species. Bloomberg visited the 130,000-square-foot warehouse in Germany, and filmed some of the most unique animals currently on sale. (Video by: Jennafer Savino, Ériver Hijano, Ryo Ikegami) (Source: Bloomberg)

Make Trade, Not War

Partition broke up an enormous economic bloc seven decades ago. Pakistan and India should try to put it back together