The Grid: Energy, Resources, Environment, Sustainability | Bloomberg

Total Annual Anthropogenic GHG Emissions

The nuclear power industry received a springtime Christmas present this week.

The world’s authoritative climate science group Sunday threw its arms around nuclear energy, among others, as a future source for powering economies. The industry’s share of global electricity generation has been falling since 1993.

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Tighter Lightbulb Standards Coming From Energy Dept. 

DOE to Strengthen Efficiency Standards for Fluorescent

Bloomberg BNA — The Energy Department plans to strengthen its energy-efficiency standards for certain types of light bulbs by up to 12.9 percent over current levels.

The proposed standards, announced in a notice published on its website April 11, could cost companies and consumers $100 million or more to develop and purchase higher-efficiency bulbs. But the department expects the energy savings, emissions reductions and other benefits of the standards to outweigh those costs.

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EPA's Power Plant Rules Top Target If Republicans Take Senate

Bloomberg BNA — A House-passed bill to curtail the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants “is a top priority” for Republicans if they gain control of the Senate in the fall elections, a House Republican said April 10.

“We think our chances are good for taking over the Senate,” Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-Ky.), who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power, told Bloomberg BNA in an on-camera interview.

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Climate Panel Weighs in Again: Today's Top Reads

Good morning! Here are today's top reads:

  • Coal's best hope rising with costliest U.S. power plant (Bloomberg)
  • Climate efforts falling short, UN panel says (NY Times)
  • Entire marine food chain at risk from rising CO2 levels in water (Guardian)
  • The race is on to protect millions of people from flooding (Scientific American)
  • How many jobs does fracking really create? (National Journal)
  • South Korea's health insurer sues tobacco makers over costs (Bloomberg)
  • Cities remain indecisive on incinerator proposals (Climate Central)
  • Visualizing what would happen if every state transitioned to renewable energy (Fast Company)
  • UN dilemma over 'Cinderella' technology (BBC)
  • Why rare earth recycling is rare and what we can do about it (GreenBiz)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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Report Offers Grim Predictions for South Texas Air Quality Amid Oil Boom

Eagle Shale Impact

InsideClimateNews.org—What might the oil- and gas-rich Eagle Ford Shale region of South Texas look like in 2018?

A newly released but largely unnoticed study commissioned by the state of Texas makes some striking projections:

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Dinosaurs Go Extinct. Again: Today's Top Read

Good afternoon! Here are today's top reads:

  • China cuts in coal use may mean world emissions peak before 2020 (Bloomberg)
  • Fake seeds force Ugandan farmers to resort to 'bronze age' agriculture (Guardian)
  • U.S. drought retreats 15 percent in one year (Climate Central)
  • Deadly bat disease found in Wisconsin, Michigan (Scientific American)
  • New global scorecard aims to promote urban development without cars (Reuters)
  • Cancer 'miracle' patients studied anew for disease clues (Bloomberg)
  • How the U.S. power grid is like a big pile of sand (National Journal)
  • Environmentalists doing it wrong, again (Washington Post)
  • 'Dinosaurs of the turtle world' at risk in Southeast U.S. rivers (Science Daily)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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Scholars See Costs, Benefits Revealed In Statistics on Shale Gas

Bloomberg BNA — Research on the local impacts of shale gas development finds a host of positive and negative impacts, with the long-term consequences still to be determined, according to scholars reviewing different aspects of the activity.

Three scholars speaking April 10 at the think tank Resources for the Future described a very mixed picture of economic benefits, local burdens, and both increases and decreases in property values.

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Bloomberg BNA — Senior Environmental Protection Agency officials consulted with at least 210 separate groups representing a broad range of interests in the Washington, D.C., area and held more than 100 meetings and events with additional organizations across regional offices as the agency prepared its carbon pollution regulation for existing power plants.

Data provided to Bloomberg BNA upon request show the agency held meetings with a broad range of unions, lawyers, publicly traded companies, trade groups, governmental agencies and state organizations and participated in several dozen events such as conference calls and conferences as the EPA prepared the proposed standards ahead of an anticipated June release.

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California Lawmakers Advance Bills to Stop Fracking

California Lawmakers Advance Legislation To Stop Hydraulic Frack

Bloomberg BNA — The Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Water Quality advanced measures April 8 seeking to impose a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing activities at oil and gas fields in California and to update the state's oil spill response program to address the risks of importing crude oil by rail.

Both bills now head to the Senate Committee on Environmental Quality for further action.

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Years of Living Dangerously

James Cameron directed the two highest-grossing movies of all time, Avatar and Titanic. This week he premieres The Years of Living Dangerously, a nine-part Showtime documentary about climate change.

That makes him the ideal target for this question: 'Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic' is a common cliche about how international climate talks never seem to go anywhere. Given your work on climate change and the Titanic, that sound right to you?

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About The Grid

Nations and companies face rising competition for strategic resources — energy, food, water, materials — and the technologies that make best use of them. That's sustainability. It's about the 21st-century race for wealth, health and long-term security, across the global grid.

Analyses or commentary in this blog are the views of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Bloomberg News.

Eric Roston, Editor
eroston@bloomberg.net

Tom Randall, Deputy Editor
trandall6@bloomberg.net

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