The Grid: Energy, Resources, Environment, Sustainability | Bloomberg

BP Is Back: Today's Top Reads

Good morning! Here are today's top reads:

  • U.S. agrees to allow BP back into gulf waters to seek oil (NY Times)
  • Tesla batteries’ graphite adding to china pollution (Bloomberg)
  • Report finds punctuality trumps safety at Metro-North (NY Times)
  • Here is exactly what the chamber of commerce thinks about global warming (National Journal)
  • What winds from 20 massive winter storms look like (Climate Central)
  • Russia picks an odd time to put on climate halo (Bloomberg)
  • North Carolina environment agency worked with Duke Energy on coal ash spills (Guardian)
  • Dems grapple with dilemma on Keystone XL pipeline (Washington Post)
  • As gas prices fluctuate, support for mass transit rises (Atlantic Cities)
  • 'Fairtrade isn't fair enough'? It's just not that simple (Guardian)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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'Cost of Carbon' Doesn't Include Some Climate Risks

Social Cost of Carbon Figure Doesn't Quantify Some Harms Posed b

Bloomberg BNA – The federal government's revised social cost of carbon figure is too low to adequately capture several social and economic harms posed by climate change, environmental groups said in a report released March 13.

The $37 per metric ton figure that federal agencies use to calculate the impact of climate change in their regulations is either missing or improperly quantifying the threats posed by increased risk of high-ozone days, drought, ocean acidification, loss of species and habitat and other impacts, according to the report, “Omitted Damages: What's Missing From the Social Cost of Carbon,” issued by the Institute for Policy Integrity, the Environmental Defense Fund and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

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Russia Picks an Odd Time to Put on Climate Halo

Crimean Factory

How do you prevent a jump in your carbon pollution? Don't invade anybody.

Take Russia. At a meeting yesterday of 200 or so national climate negotiators in Bonn, Russia’s Oleg Shamanov said his country wanted to launch a market for trading carbon pollution credits. The sooner the country can gain experience in a domestic cap-and-trade system, he said, the sooner it can link up to carbon markets in other countries or regions.

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Pollution Pays: Today's Top Reads

Good morning! Here are today's top reads:

  • Panasonic to pay expat workers in China pollution compensation (Guardian)
  • EPA's proposed rules on water worry farmers (NY Times)
  • Oil-fouled waters spoil Niger delta as homes abandoned (Bloomberg)
  • Social cost of carbon greatly underestimated (Climate Central)
  • Call for 'frack-free zones' to protect U.K.'s wildlife and water (Guardian)
  • China sticks with coal gasification to curb smog despite potentially big rise in CO2 emissions (ClimateWire)
  • Christie's opposition to Tesla spurs cries of hypocrisy (Bloomberg)
  • GOP goes head-hunting in EPA climate probe (National Journal)
  • Uncertainty is the new denial (New Economics Foundation)
  • We should all be eating more insects, but we probably won't - yet (Atlantic Cities)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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Tech Needed to Combat Climate Change: Murkowski

Murkowski Says New Technologies Needed to Combat Climate Change

Bloomberg BNA – The U.S. has made progress at addressing climate change, but additional technologies are needed to promote the use of abundant energy resources while combating emissions, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) told Bloomberg BNA.

Murkowski, ranking member on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, said the U.S. needed to invest in energy efficiency and energy conservation, and use best practices and new technologies to drive down emissions that contribute to climate change.

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NASA's Bleak Forecast: Today's Top Reads 

Good morning! Here are today's top reads:

  • NASA study projects higher temperatures despite recent slowdown in global warming (Bloomberg)
  • Fukushima Contamination in U.S. waters refuted by NRC (Bloomberg)
  • For EPA's global warming rules, will 'next year' mean 'never'? (National Journal)
  • Ohio looks at whether fracking led to two quakes (NY Times)
  • Tokyo's carbon market for office buildings is all 'cap' and not much 'trade' (Atlantic Cities)
  • Bovine TB cattle slaughter numbers fell in 2013 (Guardian)
  • Climate is out of sync with agriculture (Bloomberg)
  • Unions: Keystone review 'reeks of politics' (Hill)
  • Senate climate dodge (Wall Street Journal)
  • Can U.S. fracked gas save Ukraine? (Scientific American)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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Drought

Bloomberg BNA – Global temperatures will likely continue to rise in coming decades on track with higher estimates, despite a recent slowdown in the rate of global warming, according to a new study from a National Aeronautics and Space Administration scientist.

The study sought to reconcile different estimates for the Earth's climate sensitivity, or how temperatures change in response to changes in the atmosphere.

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New Round of Climate Talks Focuses on Setting Deadlines

Climate Talks in Bonn Focus on Deadline For Proposing Emissions-

Bloomberg BNA – The latest round of United Nations climate talks began March 10 in Bonn with a call for “concrete action” from the UN's top climate change official.

Christiana Figueres, head of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, said during the opening plenary session that she has received support from local political leaders, nongovernmental groups, private citizens and even military officials, and she urged delegates to help put that support into action at the highest level.

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Conflict-Free Solar: Today's Top Reads

Good morning! Here are today's top reads:

  • Does climate change stand a chance against the oil boom in U.S. Elections (Scientific American)
  • These things are so pretty. They must be useful, too. Right? (Bloomberg)
  • From mines to megawatts: The promise of ‘conflict-free Big Solar’ (GreenBiz)
  • Severe drought plan would move California salmon by truck (Fresno Bee)
  • Senate democrats’ all-nighter flags climate change (NY Times)
  • Japan’s giant tsunami wall fails to stop atomic power fears (Bloomberg)
  • Ethical farming dilemma: Should we be helping the chicken or fixing the egg (Guardian)
  • This drug won’t stop the heroin epidemic. But it can help (National Journal)
  • The monitored man (NY Times)
  • U.N. wars food security a risk to Asia-Pacific (Reuters)

Visit www.bloomberg.com/sustainability for the latest from Bloomberg News about energy, natural resources and global business.

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Did Spate of Wet Weather Fuel the Reign of Genghis Khan?

Genghis Khan

Climate Central — During the early 1200s, Genghis Khan and his Mongol warriors swept across much of Asia, massacring populations wholesale — by one estimate killing 40 million in just 20 years. Historians have long thought that part of their motivation for expansion had to do with climate. A new analysis in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that this theory is literally all wet.

Arid conditions in Genghis Khan’s home territory of northern Mongolia, goes the story, drove him and his hordes outward in search of better land. But the new research suggests that the local climate at the time he began his murderous conquests was the wettest it’s been in roughly the past 1,100 years.

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About The Grid

Nations and companies face rising competition for strategic resources — energy, food, water, materials — and the technologies that make best use of them. That's sustainability. It's about the 21st-century race for wealth, health and long-term security, across the global grid.

Analyses or commentary in this blog are the views of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Bloomberg News.

Eric Roston, Editor
eroston@bloomberg.net

Tom Randall, Deputy Editor
trandall6@bloomberg.net

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