Korn Ferry Survey: Seven in 10 Executives See Better Job Prospects for 2014 College Grads Than Last Year’s Class, but More

  Korn Ferry Survey: Seven in 10 Executives See Better Job Prospects for 2014
  College Grads Than Last Year’s Class, but More Education Required

  82% acknowledge that it’s more difficult for new grads to get jobs than in
                                 ‘their day’

    Most see a college degree as ‘less valuable’ than when they graduated

    77% of executives believe a graduate degree is ‘worth the investment’

Business Wire

LOS ANGELES -- April 22, 2014

Roughly seven in 10 senior executives (67%) say job prospects are better for
the undergraduate class of 2014 than what faced college grads a year ago,
according to a survey conducted in April by Korn Ferry (NYSE: KFY), the
world’s largest executive recruiting firm and single source of leadership and
talent-consulting services.

The vast majority of executives (82%) readily acknowledge that jobs are still
harder to come by today than when they graduated.

Today’s College Degree – Not What It Used to Be?

When it comes to building their own careers, executives are in lockstep on the
critical role that education played. Nearly nine in 10 (87%) say that their
studies prepared them for the jobs they’re in now. More than six in 10 (62%)
believe their college degree was “necessary” for their career success.

However, when looking at the class of 2014, surprisingly, most (54%) believe
that a college degree today is “less valuable” than it was when they donned
their caps and gowns years ago.

“An education determines a worker’s earnings for life. Increasingly the value
of today’s graduate degree is the equivalent of yesterday’s undergraduate
degree,” said Korn Ferry CEO Gary D. Burnison. “For the class of 2014 entering
a workforce that is fast changing and complex, there is a strong premium
placed on those who are learning agile – the college graduates who can adapt,
grow and evolve in a dynamic environment.”

Echoing the importance of securing an advanced degree to prepare for today’s
increasingly complex environment, 77% of executives say that a graduate degree
is “worth the investment.”

From April 1-14, Korn Ferry surveyed nearly 200 corporate executives.

Full Korn Ferry Executive Survey Results

Do you think that the prospects for college graduates this year are better or
worse than a year ago? Than three years ago?
                      One Year Ago             Three Years Ago
Better                 67%                      56%
Worse                  33%                       44%

Is a college degree necessary for career success?
Yes                    62%
No                     38%

Is it easier or harder for a 2014 college graduate to get a job compared to
the year you graduated?
Harder                 82%
Easier                 18%

Do you think your education prepared you for the job you have now?
Yes                    87%
No                     13%

Is the US education system preparing students to be highly competitive
workers?
Yes                    44%
No                     56%

Is a college degree today more or less valuable than it was when you
graduated?
More                   46%
Less                   54%

Do you think a graduate degree (doctorate, masters etc.) is worth the
investment?
Yes                    77%
No                     23%
                                                                       

About Korn Ferry

Korn Ferry designs, builds, attracts and ignites talent. Since our inception,
clients have trusted us to help recruit world-class leadership. Today, we are
a single source for leadership and talent consulting services to empower
businesses and leaders to reach their goals. Our solutions range from
executive

recruitment and leadership development programs, to enterprise learning,
succession planning and recruitment process outsourcing (RPO). Visit
kornferry.com for more information.

Contact:

Korn Ferry
Stacy Levyn, 310-556-8502
Stacy.levyn@kornferry.com
 
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