Poll: Overwhelming Majority Opposed To State House Involvement In Manufacturer/Retailer Contracts

      Poll: Overwhelming Majority Opposed To State House Involvement In
                       Manufacturer/Retailer Contracts

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, May 20, 2013

New Hampshire Consumers Want Car Buying Reform, Not Dealer Protection

WASHINGTON, May 20, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Independent poll results
released today by automakers show the overwhelming majority of New Hampshire
residents are opposed to state legislature involvement in the private business
relationships between auto manufacturers and retail car dealers. Seventy-one
(71) percent of respondents say government should stay out of such private
business matters, with only 11 percent supportive of legislative involvement.

"New Hampshire consumers are clearly opposed to the State House interceding in
private business contracts between two willing parties, and 7 out of 10
respondents oppose any state legislative action that would block automakers
from implementing much-needed reforms to improve the car buying process," said
Dan Gage, Director of Communications and Public Affairs for the Alliance of
Automobile Manufacturers. "Senate Bill 126 is an unfair favor for wealthy car
dealers at the expense of everyone else. It will cost consumers more."

Gage indicated that poll results demonstrate that New Hampshire consumers
support automakers' ongoing efforts to reform and improve the car buying
process:

  o70 percent currently do not look forward to the car buying process;
  o66 percent want to be treated more like a VIP when buying a new vehicle;
  o94 percent believe more transparent pricing that lists hidden dealer costs
    is either very important (84 percent) or somewhat important (10 percent);
  o79 percent believe a consumer-friendly shopping experience is either very
    important (50 percent) or somewhat important (29 percent);
  o76 percent believe an end to unnecessary pressure from car salesmen is
    either very important (47 percent) or somewhat important (29 percent);
  o78 percent say a faster, easier process of selecting vehicle options is
    either very important (44 percent) or somewhat important (34 percent);
  o68 percent say automakers should have a say in how their products are sold
    and represented to consumers; and
  o69 percent oppose any state action intended to block manufacturer reforms.

"This polling shows that the overwhelming majority of New Hampshire consumers
support ongoing manufacturer-led initiatives to make the car buying process
simpler, more transparent, and more consumer-friendly," said Gage. "Dealers
argue that their legislation is pro-consumer, but nothing in their special
favor bill would address a single important reform identified by consumers or
lower their costs. It will instead do the opposite and preserve the status
quo."

According to the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA), car dealers
in 2012 made the highest profits ever recorded in NADA's history, rising 6%
from previous record setting profits recorded in 2011 and proving dealers do
not need special protections or favors from Concord.

"Lawmakers have a clear decision ahead – side with wealthy car dealers or side
with New Hampshire consumers," added Gage. "Quite simply, it's a bill by
dealers for dealers and no one else."

The poll of 800 New Hampshire adults, with a +/-4 percentage points margin of
sampling error, was conducted on May 8^th by Pulse Opinion Research on behalf
of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, the leading advocacy group for the
auto industry, represents 77% of all car and light truck sales in the United
States, including the BMW Group, Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company,
General Motors Corporation, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz USA,
Mitsubishi Motors, Porsche, Toyota, Volkswagen Group of America and Volvo Cars
North America.

SOURCE Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers

Website: http://www.autoalliance.org
 
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