Harper government announces first steps towards World-Class Tanker Safety System

Harper government announces first steps towards World-Class Tanker Safety 
System 
VANCOUVER, March 18, 2013 /CNW/ - The Harper government today announced a 
number of measures toward the creation of a World-Class Tanker Safety System. 
The implementation of eight tanker safety measures was announced along with 
the introduction of the Safeguarding Canada's Seas and Skies Act, and the 
creation of a Tanker Safety Expert Panel to review Canada's current tanker 
safety system and propose further measures to strengthen it.The announcement 
was made by the Honourable Denis Lebel, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure 
and Communities and the Honourable Joe Oliver, Minister of Natural Resources. 
"Our government is working to strengthen the safety of Canadians and better 
protect the environment," said Minister Lebel. "I am pleased to announce the 
first steps towards the development of a World-Class Tanker Safety System off 
the West and East coasts of Canada. 
"While our current tanker safety system has served us well for many years, it 
is essential that we strengthen it to meet future needs, as the transportation 
of Canadian exports is expected to grow and create many high-quality jobs in 
Canada." 
"As a trading nation, Canada depends on marine shipping for economic growth, 
jobs and long-term prosperity," said Minister Oliver. "There will be no 
pipeline development without rigorous environmental protection measures and 
the tanker safety initiatives we are announcing today are an important aspect 
of our plan for Responsible Resource Development." 
As part of its plan to create a World-Class Tanker Safety System, the 
government will, in the weeks and months ahead, work and engage with 
Aboriginal communities. 
The Tanker Safety Expert Panel will review Canada's current system and propose 
further measures to strengthen it. In the coming months, the panel will 
consult with key stakeholders to enhance the government's knowledge and 
understanding of how well the current system is working, review our current 
preparedness and response capacity, and propose new ways to bring Canada's 
tanker safety system to a world-class status. 
"Our panel will work on recommendations to make a strong tanker safety system 
world-class," said Captain Gordon Houston, Chair of the Tanker Safety Expert 
Panel. "Together, our panel members have 120 years of maritime experience and 
a deep commitment to the environment." 
Today, the government has also tabled the Safeguarding Canada's Seas and Skies 
Act, which is amending the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. The proposed amendments 
will: 


    --  strengthen the current requirements for pollution prevention
        and response at oil handling facilities;
    --  increase Transport Canada's oversight and enforcement capacity
        by equipping marine safety inspectors with the tools to enforce
        compliance;
    --  introduce new offences for contraventions of the Act and extend
        penalties relating to pollution; and
    --  enhance response to oil spill incidents by removing legal
        barriers that could otherwise block agents of Canadian response
        organizations from participating in clean-up operations.

In addition, the Ministers announced eight measures to strengthen Canada's 
tanker safety system:
    --  Tanker inspections: The number of inspections will increase to
        ensure that all foreign tankers are inspected on their first
        visit to Canada, and annually thereafter, to ensure they comply
        with rules and regulations, especially with respect to double
        hulls.
    --  Systematic surveillance and monitoring of ships: The government
        will expand the National Aerial Surveillance Program.
    --  Incident Command System: The government will establish a
        Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) Incident Command System, which will
        allow it to respond more effectively to an incident and
        integrate its operations with key partners.
    --  Pilotage programs: We will review existing pilotage and tug
        escort requirements to see what more will be needed in the
        future.
    --  Public port designations: More ports will be designated for
        traffic control measures, starting with Kitimat.
    --  Scientific research: The government will conduct scientific
        research on non-conventional petroleum products, such as
        diluted bitumen, to enhance understanding of these substances
        and how they behave when spilled in the marine environment.
    --  New and modified aids to navigation: The CCG will ensure that
        a system of aids to navigation comprised of buoys, lights and
        other devices to warn of obstructions and to mark the location
        of preferred shipping routes is installed and maintained.
    --  Modern navigation system: The CCG will develop options for
        enhancing Canada's current navigation system (e.g. aids to
        navigation, hydrographic charts, etc) by fall 2013 for
        government consideration.

Additional information on the tanker safety panel and other initiatives to 
strengthen Canada's Tanker Safety System for Tanker Ships can be found in the 
attached backgrounders or at 
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/mediaroom/backgrounders-menu.htm

Backgrounder

Canada's tanker safety system: 
Current situation

Each year, 80 million tonnes of oil are shipped off Canada's east and west 
coasts. On any given day, there are 180vessels of over 500 tonnes gross 
tonnage that operate within waters under Canadian jurisdiction ( i.e. up to 
200 nautical miles from shore).

Canada has a system to prevent, prepare for, and, if necessary, respond to a 
ship-source spill from tanker vessels designed to transport oil as well as 
from fuel leakage from ships in general. Spills can also happen when loading 
or unloading oil at tanker terminals. Canada's system has been designed to 
respond to these risks.

Current situation on the West Coast
    --  Oil tankers have been moving safely and regularly along
        Canada's West Coast since the 1930's.
    --  In 2009-2010, there were about 1,500 tanker movements on the
        West Coast, among 475,000 vessel movements in the area.
    --  Oil is moved mostly via the ports of Vancouver, Prince Rupert
        and Kitimat. In 2009, about 8.4 million tonnes of oil was
        shipped out of Vancouver. Much of this oil is transported in
        barges to and from communities along the B.C. coast. Oil is
        also carried on-board tankers, freighters, container ships,
        domestic and international ferries, and other types of
        commercial and private vessels.
    --  A federal moratorium off the coast of B.C. applies strictly to
        oil and natural gas exploration and development, not to tanker
        storage or movement.
    --  The only significant oil spill in the last 20 years on Canada's
        West Coast was not tanker related. It occurred in 2006, when
        the B.C. ferry Queen of the North sank with 240 tonnes of oil
        on board. Prior to that, in 1988, Vancouver Island was affected
        by a spill from the Nestucca, an oil barge that lost
        approximately 1,000 tonnes of oil.
    --  It is important to note that the Exxon Valdez, which spilled
        approximately 40,000 tonnes of oil in 1989, was a single-hull
        tanker. This type of tanker is no longer allowed to operate in
        Canadian waters since, as of 2010, large crude oil tankers can
        no longer operate in our waters without a double hull (a type
        of hull where the bottom and sides of a vessel have two
        complete layers of watertight hull surface). The Exxon Valdez
        had no marine pilot on board, which is required in waters off
        the Pacific coast under Canadian law.  Further, the Exxon
        Valdez was not being escorted by a tug boat.  Laden tankers
        travelling in Canadian waters require tug boats to escort them
        to open waters.
    --  On Canada's West Coast, the National Aerial Surveillance
        Program flew 389 patrol hours and conducted 3,714 vessel
        overflights in 2011-12. In addition, 43,508 vessels were
        tracked.

March 2013

Backgrounder

Creation of the Tanker Safety Expert Panel

The Government of Canada works in a number of ways to protect our marine 
environment, and to help ensure that marine transportation is safe and 
efficient. While the current system has served Canada well, a comprehensive 
review will help us to build a stronger system that can meet future needs. 
That is why the Government of Canada announced the creation of the Tanker 
Safety Expert Panel.

Brander-Smith Panel

The last panel to review Canada's tanker safety sytem was commissioned 
following the 1989 Exxon Valdez incident and led to the Brander-Smith Report. 
In response to the recommendations contained in this report, a comprehensive 
national Marine Oil Spill Preparedness and Response System was developed. This 
system established a level of preparedness to respond to marine oil pollution 
incidents in Canadian marine regions south of 60° north latitude.

New measures

While the current system has met existing needs, and there have been no major 
spills involving oil tankers, the dynamics of oil transportation have changed 
significantly. For example, oil and liquefied natural gas shipments have 
increased significantly along with the transport of hazardous and noxious 
substances. The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development 
has recommended that the Government of Canada ensure that Canada is prepared 
to respond to ship-source oil and chemical spills in Canadian waters.

The Government of Canada is also investing in a suite of measures to 
strengthen tanker safety and to review the legislative and regulatory 
frameworks related to it. A key component of these measures is the creation of 
a panel, which will develop recommendations for a world-class tanker safety 
system.

The Tanker Safety Expert Panel will conduct a pan-Canadian, evidence-based 
review and assessment of Canada's tanker safety system to make recommendations 
to the Government of Canada on the development of a world class system. 
Specifically, the panel will assess the system's structure, functionality and 
its overall efficiency and effectiveness.

The review will have two components: the first component will focus on the 
system currently in place south of 60° north latitude, while the second 
component will focus on the requirements needed for the Arctic as well as a 
national review of the requirements for hazardous and noxious substances, 
including liquefied natural gas.

In particular, the review will focus on the following elements:
    --  Current capacity: Is the current regulated response capacity of
        10,000 tonnes a world-class standard and what would be the
        costs and benefits of changing this requirement?
    --  Model: How effective is the system's structure, including its
        private-public model, funding and fee arrangements, and
        placement of response assets?
    --  Coverage: Is there a need to extend the current system to other
        substances and create a new cost-effective preparedness and
        response system in the North?

Panel members

John Gordon Houston, Chair

Captain Gordon Houston is the former President and CEO of the Vancouver Fraser 
Port Authority. He attended Edinburgh University's Nautical Campus receiving 
the designation of Master Mariner in 1975. He also holds a nautical science 
diploma from Aigburth Nautical College. After a seagoing career spanning two 
decades, CaptainHouston joined the Prince Rupert Port Corporation as Harbour 
Master in 1988. Later, he joined the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, as 
Deputy Harbour Master, and then as Harbour Master where, among his other 
duties, he represented the Port during the creation of Canada's current Marine 
Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime.

In 1996, he moved into the Port's executive ranks, as Vice President, 
Operations. After five years in this role, Captain Houston was appointed 
President and CEO of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority where he oversaw the 
amalgamation of the three ports in the Lower Mainland.

Richard Gaudreau

Mr. Gaudreau has been practicing law since 1969. His experience includes all 
activities related to maritime and admiralty law, particularly ship 
purchasing/selling/financing/chartering, carrier liability, environment law, 
collisions, salvage and all aspects of marine and protection and indemnity 
insurance. He also practices in all activities related to international trade. 
He has vast experience before Canadian and Québec courts, including the 
Supreme Court of Canada.

He was the chairperson of several Québec and Canadian marine-related 
organizations. Mr. Gaudreau has been involved in numerous arbitrations, both 
as a lawyer and an arbitrator. He has chaired a number of public inquiries and 
studied and drafted maritime and port legislation and regulations in Canada 
and abroad.

In 2002, Mr. Gaudreau was involved in the private practice of law, and taught 
post graduate courses in marine transportation management at the Université 
du Québec à Rimouski. He served as a Lieutenant in the Canadian Naval 
Reserve, and held the positions of Director of the St. Lawrence Economic 
Development Council, and Chairman of the Board of the St. Lawrence Economic 
Development Council. Mr. Gaudreau is an active member of the National 
Coalition on the Coast Guard Recovery Program, the Canadian Bar Association, 
and the Quebec Provincial Bar Association.

Michael Mackay Sinclair

Dr. Michael Sinclair is the former Director of the Bedford Institute of 
Oceanography in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. He holds a Ph.D. in Oceanography 
from the University of California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He 
also attended Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and Southampton 
University in the U.K., where he earned his B.Sc. and M.Sc., respectively.

After positions at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Université 
du Québec à Rimouski, Dr. Sinclair joined the Bedford Institute in 1978. By 
1988, he was appointed to the position of Director, Biological Sciences Branch 
for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans at the Bedford Institute. He later 
managed the Marine Fish Division before being appointed, in 2000, Director of 
the Bedford Institute and Regional Director of Science, Maritimes Region, for 
the Department of Fisheries and Ocean. During his directorship at the Bedford 
Institute, Dr. Sinclair led the initiative to establish the Centre for 
Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research (COOGER), the Department of 
Fisheries and Oceans' first national centre of excellence. He also contributed 
to the establishment of a comprehensive monitoring program for the shelf-seas 
off Atlantic Canada, in support of integrated management of ocean uses, 
including the oil and gas offshore activities. From 2010 to 2012, he was the 
President of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), 
the international organization which coordinates research, and provides 
scientific advice on marine issues, for countries bordering the North 
Atlantic. Dr. Sinclair has numerous publications relating to marine ecosystems.

March 2013

Backgrounder

World-Class Tanker Safety System: 
Amendments to the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 
(Safeguarding Canada's Seas and Skies Act)

Among the measures to create a World-Class Tanker Safety System, the 
Government of Canada has proposed amendments to the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 
to strengthen ship-source oil spill preparedness and response, introduce new 
requirements for oil handling facilities, and establish new offences for the 
contravention of pollution prevention provisions in Canada's waters, including 
administrative monetary penalties (AMP).

The proposed amendments will:
    --  strengthen the current requirements for pollution prevention
        and response at oil handling facilities, requiring operators to
        be proactive in the prevention of spills, and also to have the
        capacity to effectively respond to a spill, if required.
        Currently, oil handling facilities are required to have
        emergency response plans in place. However, they are not
        obliged to submit these plans to Transport Canada. These
        amendments will make it mandatory for operators to provide
        these plans to Transport Canada to ensure they meet the
        regulations;
    --  increase Transport Canada's oversight and enforcement capacity
        by equipping marine safety inspectors with tools to effectively
        ensure compliance, introducing new offences for contraventions
        of the Act and extending the Administrative Monetary Penalty
        provisions to the Pollution Prevention and Response portion of
        the Act (Part 8). By doing so, Marine Safety inspectors have
        the ability to impose administrative monetary penalties to oil
        handling facilities not in compliance with regulations; and
    --  enhance response to oil spill incidents by removing legal
        barriers that could otherwise block agents of Canadian response
        organizations from participating in clean-up operations. Right
        now, Canadian oil spill response organizations have civil and
        criminal immunity in the Act when they respond to spills from
        ships. We will expand this immunity for when they respond to
        spills from oil handling facilities and provide immunity to
        foreign response organizations.

Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations

Administrative monetary penalties are civil fines designed to ensure 
compliance with legislation as well as regulations and can address a range of 
compliance issues: some relatively minor and some more severe. An 
administrative monetary penalty takes away the financial incentives of rule 
breaking and thereby removes the financial benefit, advantage, or gain a 
person or corporation can achieve by committing a violation. It helps ensure 
future compliance by discouraging others from violating legal requirements.

When the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA 2001) came into force on July 1(st), 
2007, Transport Canada introduced administrative monetary penalties to certain 
parts of the Act, as a new enforcement mechanism designed to promote 
compliance and penalize those who did not comply. This approach provides 
Transport Canada with a more effective compliance program that improves the 
safety of the marine community, the marine environment and ultimately the 
general public.

These administrative enforcement tools were introduced when the Administrative 
Monetary Penalties Regulations came into force on April 3(rd), 2008. The 
current penalties range from $250 to $25,000. Anyone who is issued an AMP may 
request a review by the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canadawww.tatc.gc.ca.

Although Transport Canada has introduced administrative monetary penalties, 
the department retains the ability to prosecute those who do not comply with 
the CSA 2001 or its regulations.

Should a major oil spill occur in Canadian waters, offenders would be 
prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

Currently, the Administrative Monetary Penalty regime does not apply to Part 8 
of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, which deals with pollution preparedness and 
response. The government's proposed amendments to the Act would apply the AMP 
regime to Part 8. Once the Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations are 
updated to include the requirements contained in Part 8 and its regulations, 
marine safety inspectors will be able to issue administrative monetary 
penalties for non-compliance with the Act.

March 2013

Backgrounder

World-class tanker safety system:
Safe tankers through rigorous inspection and prevention

The Government of Canada is committed to protecting both the safety of 
Canadians and the environment. No development will proceed unless rigorous 
environment protection measures are in place. These goals are part of its plan 
for Responsible Resource Development, which aims to create high-quality jobs, 
economic growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians. Canada is taking 
further action to ensure that it has a world-class tanker safety system for 
shipping oil and liquefied natural gas safely through Canada's waterways 
before any major new energy export facilities become operational.

Eight new measures will strengthen Canada's tanker safety system.

  1. Tanker inspections: The number of inspections will increase to
     ensure that all foreign tankers are inspected on their first visit
     to Canada, and annually thereafter, to ensure they comply with


 rules and regulations, especially with respect to double hulls.
  2. Systematic surveillance and monitoring of ships: The government 
 will expand the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP).
  3. Incident Command System: The government will establish a Canadian 


     Coast Guard Incident Command System which will allow it to respond
     more effectively to an incident and integrate its operations with


 key partners.
  4. Pilotage programs: We will review existing pilotage and tug escort 
 requirements to see what more will be needed in the future.
  5. Public port designations: More ports will be designated for 
 traffic control measures, starting with Kimitat.
  6. Scientific research: The government will conduct scientific 


     research on non-conventional petroleum products, such as diluted
     bitumen, to enhance understanding of these substances and how they


 behave when spilled in the marine environment.
  7. New and modified aids to navigation: The Canadian Coast Guard 


     (CCG)  will ensure that a system of aids to navigation comprised
     of buoys, lights and other devices, to warn of obstructions and to
     mark the location of preferred shipping routes, is installed and


 maintained.
  8. Modern navigation system: The CCG will develop options for 


     enhancing Canada's current navigation system (e.g. aids to
     navigation, hydrographic charts, etc) by fall 2013 for government
     consideration.

Tanker inspections

As of 2010, large crude oil tankers can no longer operate in Canadian waters 
without a double hull. A double hull is a type of hull where the bottom and 
sides of a vessel have two complete layers of watertight hull surface.

Transport Canada currently has a requirement for all Canadian-flagged tankers 
to be inspected at least once a year to ensure they are compliant with current 
legislation and regulations.

The new measures will increase inspections of all foreign tankers to ensure 
Canada achieves its policy of inspecting each one on its first visit to Canada 
and annually thereafter.

Systematic aerial surveillance and monitoring of ships

A watchful eye is kept over ships transiting waters under Canadian 
jurisdiction through the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Three 
aircraft strategically placed across the country monitor shipping activities 
over all waters under Canadian jurisdiction using sophisticated 
state-of-the-art remote sensing equipment including Environment Canada's 
Integrated Satellite Tracking of Pollution Program (ISTOP) - which can 
identify potential spills from satellite images.

Investigations have led to numerous successful prosecutions against marine 
polluters over the years, with some cases resulting in financial penalties 
over $100,000. Nationally, the NASP flew 2,064 patrol hours in 2011-2012. 
During these patrols, 12,032 vessels were overflown, 135 pollution sightings 
were detected and 73,315 vessels were tracked.

Long-term funding will be provided to support NASP and the program will be 
enhanced to boost surveillance efforts in areas such as northern British 
Columbia and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Pilotage programs

All tanker operators operating within a compulsory pilotage area must take on 
board a marine pilot with local knowledge. The boarding pilot's extensive 
knowledge of the local waterway can guide the vessel safely to its destination.

Canada's four pilotage authorities are responsible for providing safe, 
reliable and efficient marine pilotage services at ports in all geographic 
areas of the country. The four pilotage authorities in Canada are the Atlantic 
Pilotage Authority, the Great Lakes Pilotage Authority, the Pacific Pilotage 
Authority and the Laurentian Pilotage Authority.

Transport Canada will review the legal and voluntary measures currently in 
place to safely guide vessels to their destination. This review will 
determine what, if any, legislative and/or regulatory changes to the Pilotage 
Act or the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 are needed by fall 2013.

Public port designations

The Government of Canada will designate Kitimat as a public port under the 
Canada Marine Act. This designation will allow the port to put in place 
better traffic control measures to facilitate the safe movement of vessels. 
A national risk assessment will help to identify other ports for this 
designation as well.

Incident Command System

As the lead federal agency to ensure an appropriate response to a spill, the 
Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) must work effectively with other partners to ensure 
the protection of the marine environment and public safety. As such, the CCG 
will adopt the Incident Command System, which will allow for a more effective 
response to a major spill and integrate its operations with key partners, such 
as Canada's private-sector response organizations. The Incident Command System 
is an internationally accepted emergency management system used for the 
command, control, and coordination of emergency response operations.

Scientific research

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Natural Resources Canada 
will conduct scientific research on non-conventional petroleum products, such 
as diluted bitumen, to enhance understanding of these substances and how they 
behave when spilled in the marine environment. The results of these scientific 
research projects will fortify Canada's marine prevention, preparedness and 
response capabilities.

Results of this integrated scientific research will inform decision-making in 
the areas of spill-response technologies and countermeasures, enabling 
identification of best practices with regard to the selection of the best 
response tools in a given situation. This research will also provide better 
understanding of the effect of products, like diluted bitumen, on marine 
ecosystems. Finally, research will inform strategies to protect the marine 
environment and its shorelines.

Working together, the three departments will examine diluted bitumen to 
develop a more profound understanding of the product's chemical and physical 
properties, and its behaviour in marine environments.

New and modified aids to navigation

The CCG will ensure that asystem of aids to navigation comprised of 
buoys,lightsand other devices to warn of obstructions and to mark the 
location of preferred shipping routesis installed and maintained.The 
Canadian Hydrographic Service will conduct hydrographic surveys and will 
incorporate the aids to navigation information along with othersafety 
information to generate improved navigational charts and other related safety 
products. Aids to navigation and hydrographic charts and safety information 
areimportant elements of Canada's marine navigation system. Implementation 
of these measureswill ensure marinersare adequately provided with the 
navigational supportthey require forsafe and efficient navigation of 
vessels to and from the Port of Kitimat.

Modern navigation system

The CCG, together with the Canadian Hydrographic Service will develop options 
for enhancing Canada's current navigation system (e.g. aids to navigation, 
hydrographic charts, etc) by fall 2013.

Stakeholders have indicated that Canada's current navigation system could be 
improved by leveraging advances in data collection and communications 
technologies. Relevant navigational information (e.g. charts, buoy status, 
weather, ice conditions, etc.) can now be made electronically available to 
vessels in real-time, if the right technology is available, thereby improving 
the safety and efficiency of marine transportation.

March 2013

Backgrounder

World-Class Tanker Safety System: 
liability and compensation

Canada's liability and compensation regime for oil spills are based on the 
"polluter pays" principle, which means that the polluter is always responsible 
for paying for the cost of an oil spill clean up, including third party 
damages. This means that if a ship causes a spill, its owner is liable for 
losses and damages under federal legislation.

Furthermore, in accordance with international conventions, ship owners are 
subject to compulsory insurance to an amount which is linked to the tonnage of 
their vessel. If the amount of damages exceeds the shipowner's liability, 
international and domestic funds provide additional compensation to a total 
amount of approximately $1.36 billion.

The Government of Canada is committed to reviewing Canada's liability and 
compensation regime and is taking further action to ensure that it has a 
world-class tanker safety system for shipping resources safely through 
Canada's waterways before any major new energy export infrastructure becomes 
operational.

The government will undertake a comprehensive review of the oil pollution 
liability and compensation regime associated with marine transportation 
spills, based on a risk assessment. The review will include examining the 
adequacy of the compensation available in the event of a spill and the 
relevant legislation will be updated to ensure a comprehensive oversight 
system that places the cost of paying for pollution with the polluter, not 
Canadian taxpayers.

This review, to be completed in fall 2013, will guide the Government of Canada 
as it modernizes the Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund, examining its overall 
application and use.

The concepts of polluter pays, international uniformity and shared liability 
between ship owners and cargo owners are cornerstones of the current liability 
and compensation regime, and will continue to be integral to it in the future. 
The review will ensure that those principles are applied in a way that 
protects Canadians and is consistent with current realities and that Canada 
continues to be a leader in this area.

March 2013



Geneviève Sicard Press Secretary Office of the Honourable Denis Lebel 
Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Ottawa 613-991-0700  
David Provencher Press Secretary Office of the Honourable Joe Oliver Canada's 
Minister of Natural Resources 613-996-2007

Media Relations Transport Canada Ottawa 613-993-0055  Media Relations Natural 
Resources Canada Ottawa 613-992-4447

This news release may be made available in alternative formats for  persons 
living with visual disabilities.

SOURCE: Transport Canada

To view this news release in HTML formatting, please use the following URL: 
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-0- Mar/18/2013 20:34 GMT