Focus Your Distracted World with Brain Age: Concentration Training

  Focus Your Distracted World with Brain Age: Concentration Training

          Pick Up Nintendo 3DS and Train to Improve Your Modern Mind

Business Wire

REDMOND, Wash. -- February 11, 2013

A working mom rushes to schedule a meeting while answering emails and getting
dinner ready for the kids. A student crams for a midterm the morning before an
exam, but can’t stop thinking about the urgent paper he has to complete later
in the week. A video game fan plays her favorite game for hours, but starts to
forget where the key to the final dungeon is located after updating social
media and checking out the latest blog post on her favorite website.

What all these people have in common is a need for a more focused mind. Having
a focused mind can help lead to better performance in all life activities,
especially in this modern world full of distractions. Whether it is in the
office, the classroom or a far-off fantasy kingdom, distractions come from all
directions, making it easy to lose focus and difficult to concentrate on the
tasks at hand. Actually, it is almost inevitable that … wait, what were we
saying?

With the launch of Brain Age: Concentration Training for the Nintendo 3DS
system, multitaskers can refocus their busy modern minds and get their
concentration back on track.

“With so much happening around us on a constant basis, it is very easy to get
distracted,” said Scott Moffitt, Nintendo of America’s executive vice
president of Sales & Marketing. “The Brain Age series has always been about
training the brain, and Brain Age: Concentration Training continues this trend
while also helping to improve concentration.”

The first two games in the Brain Age series on Nintendo DS surprised the world
by demonstrating how brain training for just a few minutes a day could be fun.
Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day! and Brain Age 2: More Training
in Minutes a Day! each went on to sell more than 3 million in the U.S. alone.
Brain Age: Concentration Training builds on the winning formula of the first
two games, while introducing new activities designed by Dr. Ryuta Kawashima, a
neuroscientist in Japan, to specifically focus the mind and help with everyday
distractions.

New to this game are the Devilish Training exercises, challenging activities
that set out to stimulate concentration and working memory. These activities
can be played for five minutes a day, making them the perfect exercises to
pick up while going through the morning routine. These Devilish Training
activities challenge players to focus on one task while simultaneously
tracking another, and range from Devilish Calculations, a series of tricky
math problems, to Devilish Mice, a clever memory game. The difficulty of each
activity increases or decreases based on players’ real-time results. This
helps to consistently train players at the limit of their abilities.

Many other modes are also featured in Brain Age: Concentration Training. In
Supplemental Training, fan-favorite activities from previous Brain Age games
make a return. These select activities were designed to complement Devilish
Training, and include activities like Word Attack, a hectic word-recognition
exercise, and Time Lapse. Under Brain Training, players are offered additional
training opportunities, such as Block Head, an exercise that finds players
taking turns occupying blocks to score points against Kawashima. There is also
Relaxation Mode, which contains a collection of restful activities created to
give brains a much-needed break. Additionally, players can use the game’s
StreetPass feature to find potential Training Partners to review brain
training results or to compete in Devilish Battles.

With more modes and more activities than ever before, Brain Age: Concentration
Training is the biggest game yet in the celebrated series. It’s time to use
new concentration skills to start training the modern brain and eliminating
distractions.

Brain Age: Concentration Training is now available in retail stores or as a
full download in the Nintendo eShop for Nintendo 3DS.

Remember that Nintendo 3DS features parental controls that let adults manage
the content their children can access. For more information about this and
other features, visit http://www.nintendo.com/3ds.

For more information about Brain Age: Concentration Training, visit
http://brainage.nintendo.com/.

About Nintendo: The worldwide pioneer in the creation of interactive
entertainment, Nintendo Co., Ltd., of Kyoto, Japan, manufactures and markets
hardware and software for its Wii U^™ and Wii^™ home consoles, and Nintendo
3DS^™ and Nintendo DS^™ families of portable systems. Since 1983, when it
launched the Nintendo Entertainment System^™, Nintendo has sold more than 4
billion video games and more than 651 million hardware units globally,
including the current-generation Wii U, Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo 3DS XL, as
well as the Game Boy^™, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, Nintendo DSi^™ and
Nintendo DSi XL^™, Super NES^™, Nintendo 64^™, Nintendo GameCube^™ and Wii
systems. It has also created industry icons that have become well-known,
household names such as Mario^™, Donkey Kong^™, Metroid^™, Zelda^™ and
Pokémon^™. A wholly owned subsidiary, Nintendo of America Inc., based in
Redmond, Wash., serves as headquarters for Nintendo’s operations in the
Western Hemisphere. For more information about Nintendo, please visit the
company’s website at http://www.nintendo.com.

Note to editors: Nintendo press materials are available at
http://press.nintendo.com, a password-protected site. To obtain a login,
please contact Deanna Avila at 213-438-8742 or davila@golinharris.com. Users
can receive instant Nintendo information by subscribing to the site’s RSS
feed.

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Contact:

GOLIN HARRIS
Jonathan Silverstein, 212-373-6046
jsilverstein@golinharris.com
or
Kristie Tomkins, 213-438-8830
ktomkins@golinharris.com
 
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