Broadcom Study Outlines Connectivity Personality Types and Top Habits of Highly Connected People

   Broadcom Study Outlines Connectivity Personality Types and Top Habits of
                           Highly Connected People

High Connectivity "Always On" Personality More Likely to be Female, Millennial
and Have a Strong Preference for Screen Time over Face Time

PR Newswire

IRVINE, Calif., Dec. 10, 2012

IRVINE, Calif., Dec. 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --

News Highlights:

  oSurvey outlines seven distinct personality types among American adults'
    connectivity habits
  oMost Americans prefer screen time over face time when communicating with
    family and friends
  oHighly connected personalities exhibit behavior patterns of extreme device
    and technology dependence and are more concerned about losing their mobile
    phones than luggage or car keys

Broadcom Corporation (NASDAQ: BRCM), a global innovation leader in
semiconductor solutions for wired and wireless communications, today announced
the results of the Broadcom Connectivity Study, a survey of 2,500 U.S. adults
measuring connectivity trends across behavioral and demographic lines in
today's digital life. The survey revealed seven distinct connectivity
personality types among American adults, defined by two key dimensions:
Connectivity, or the level of device and social media use, and Behavior, or
how web-enabled devices and online platforms are used to connect to others. It
also identified a range of characteristics of those with the greatest
connectivity quotient. A full report on the survey findings can also be
accessed here:
http://blog.broadcom.com/connecting-everything/whats-your-connectivity-style-take-the-survey-to-find-out.

Connectivity Personality Segments

The Broadcom Study explored a wide range of behaviors and attitudes around how
people use technology to connect. The survey uncovered that gender and age are
the main drivers of connectivity – the highly connected are more likely to be
female or a Millennial (ages 18-31), while the less connected tend to be male
or a member of the Baby Boomers (ages 45-64) or Greatest Generation (65 and
above). From sharing apps and content, to comparison shopping on a mobile
phone, to purchasing a connected car, the survey revealed seven categories and
preferences of American's connectivity personalities and behavior styles:

Always On: 8 percent of the U.S. adult population

This group uses technology mainly to create new content and proactively engage
others. They are the most connected of all segments. This segment sees
technology as a critical enabler of their relationships with others. This
group is more likely to be early adopters of new technology, opinion elites
(top 10 percent of the population engaged in civic and political activity),
and are more likely than other segments to use technology to connect with
people they want to know (19 percent) versus people they already know.

Live Wires: 35 percent of the U.S. adult population

This group is highly connected and tends to use technology to converse with
others. They are the most likely group to say they use technology mainly to
stay current with family and friends (69 percent). This group and Social
Skimmers are most similar in device ownership – most own smartphones (68
percent) and many own tablets (38 percent) and web-enabled TVs (24 percent).
This group is more likely to be employed full-time and in the Millennial age
group.

Social Skimmers: 6 percent of the U.S. adult population

This high connectivity group is marked by ownership of many devices, use of
many social networking sites, large online social networks, and the frequent
use of technology to connect with friends and family. Although highly
connected, this group primarily uses new technology to receive information,
rather than proactively engage with others. As such, two-thirds (66 percent)
say they have first found out about a breaking news story on social media.

Broadcasters: 8 percent of the U.S. adult population

Lower in connectivity than the highly connected, this group uses technology
selectively to create new content and tell others what they are doing, as
opposed to commenting in a more conversational fashion or initiating new
engagement. This group is the least likely to be on social media -- three in
five (60 percent) say they do not use it. Instead, this group prefers to
connect using their mobile phones and three in four (76 percent) say they
primarily make and receive calls on their cell phone.

Toe-Dippers: 27 percent of the U.S. adult population

This group is the largest of the three low connectivity groups and its members
primarily use technology to converse with others. This group chiefly owns
desktop (64 percent) and laptop (54 percent) computers, and nearly a quarter
(23 percent) use a smartphone. They are the most likely segment to say that
they prefer in-person contact when communicating with friends (43 percent),
but even for this less connected group, a majority prefers to connect with
friends using technology (57 percent).

Bystanders: 15 percent of the U.S. adult population

Bystanders are the least connected. Two in three (67 percent) own desktop
computersbut they have the lowestownership of laptops (48 percent) and only
about one in ten (12 percent) owns a smartphone. They use technology to
connect with family and friends less than three (2.8) timeseach day, which is
five times less than the national average (15.7). When they do use technology,
they use it to receive information and are the most likely group to say they
use technology primarily to keep up with news and current events (31 percent).

Never Minders: 2 percent of the U.S. adult population

This group represents a small segment of the U.S. population who are outliers;
they do not use phone, text, or social media to connect to others. This group
is apprehensive about using technology and is more likely than the other
groups to say that technology makes them feel more isolated (47 percent). When
they do connect, they are more likely to do so out of necessity. They are more
likely to say they connect to tell friends and family what they are doing (22
percent), to get ahead at work (13 percent) and to not miss out on fun
activities (13 percent).

Top Habits of Highly Connected People

The study's findings reveal the connectivity habits of the approximately one
in ten (8 percent) who are the most connected – the "Always On" Americans. The
Always On not only own more devices and are more active on social media than
the average American, but also use technology to actively initiate
conversation, whether by posting original commentary to the web, making many
phone calls throughout the day, or sending picture messages to their friends.
Demographically, the Always On are more likely to befemale or Millennial, and
are more likely to have children than other Connectivity segments. The most
common connectivity habits of Always On are:

  oGear up for being on the go. Mobile devices are an integral part of the
    Always On lifestyle.

       oThe typical member of this group does not own just one device, but
         rather owns more than four different devices (4.1), which is more
         than one device greater than the national average (2.8).
       oThey lead the pack in virtually all types of device ownership,
         especially laptops (81 percent own them), smartphones (72 percent),
         DVRs (64 percent) and tablets (46 percent).
       oBut don't assume they own a desktop – only 62 percent do, the lowest
         level of ownership across the seven personality types.

  oKeep your friends close and your devices closer. The Always On put a
    premium on technology that keeps them connected when on the go.

       oMost Americans say that they are most concerned about losing their
         purse or wallet when traveling (52 percent), but the Always On are
         most concerned about losing their mobile phone (36 percent). The
         Always On would also rather lose their luggage, car keys or house
         keys than a cell phone or laptop.
       oHalf (51 percent) say they have lost their phone or Internet
         connection and have experienced "withdrawal symptoms," which is twice
         the national average (26 percent).
       oCompared to the national average, more than twice as many Always On
         have been asked to put down their phone when eating with friends or
         family (37 percent).

  oStay in touch, from a distance. For most Americans, screen time is
    preferred to face time when interacting with others, but the Always On
    exhibit this behavior in the extreme.

       oThree out of four Always On (76 percent) prefer to use technology,
         such as email, phone or text messaging, to connect to their friends
         rather than in-person communication; and two-thirds prefer to use
         technology to communicate with their co-workers (66 percent) and
         family (62 percent).
       oBy comparison, two-thirds of American adults favor remote technology
         over in-person contact when communicating with friends (65 percent),
         three in five favor it when talking with co-workers (60 percent) and
         half prefer technology when communicating with family (54 percent).

  oAcquire affection from afar. The Always On prefer to connect to those
    they care about from a distance, and feel closer doing so.

       oNine out of ten (88 percent) Always On say that new technology makes
         them feel closer to family and friends, as opposed to feeling more
         isolated (12 percent).
       oThis is higher than any of the other segments, as well as 12 points
         higher than the national average (76 percent).
       o47 percent of the least connected among us – the 2 percent of
         Americans who do not use phone, text, or email to communicate –
         report that new technology makes them feel more isolated.

  oKeep them posted. Always On have a behavioral preference for
    self-expression.

       oWhile most Always On use technology to receive updates from family
         and friends, they are also more likely than any other group to
         primarily use technology to broadcast what they are doing (22
         percent).

  oReach out. Always On use technology to make new connections.

       oMost people use technology to stay in touch with people they know (91
         percent). However, twice as many Always On are using new technology
         to connect to people that they want to know (19 percent), compared to
         the average.

  oPlug in for a power lunch.

       oThe Always On are most connected at noon, when more than nine in ten
         (93 percent) are using a digital device.
       oDuring the lunch hour, Always On are more likely than the other
         segments to be using their mobile phones (36 percent).

Take the Survey, Review the Findings

To determine your Connectivity Personality, a condensed version of the survey
can be taken at
http://blog.broadcom.com/connecting-everything/whats-your-connectivity-style-take-the-survey-to-find-out,
where you can also access a full report on the survey findings and
accompanying infographic.

For ongoing news, visit Broadcom's Newsroom, read the B-Connected Blog, or
visit Facebook or Twitter. And to stay connected, subscribe to Broadcom's RSS
Feed.

About Broadcom

Broadcom Corporation (NASDAQ: BRCM), a FORTUNE 500® company, is a global
leader and innovator in semiconductor solutions for wired and wireless
communications. Broadcom® products seamlessly deliver voice, video, data and
multimedia connectivity in the home, office and mobile environments. With the
industry's broadest portfolio of state-of-the-art system-on-a-chip and
embedded software solutions, Broadcom is changing the world by Connecting
everything®. For more information, go to www.broadcom.com.

Broadcom®, the pulse logo, Connecting everything®, and the Connecting
everything logo are among the trademarks of Broadcom Corporation and/or its
affiliates in the United States, certain other countries and/or the EU. Any
other trademarks or trade names mentioned are the property of their respective
owners.

Contact
Susan Vander May
Sr. Manager, Public Relations
408-922-6161
susanv@broadcom.com

SOURCE Broadcom Corporation; BRCM Corporate

Website: http://www.broadcom.com
 
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