Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Calls For Letters Of Intent For 2013 Young Investigator And Established Investigator Awards

   Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Calls For Letters Of Intent For 2013 Young
               Investigator And Established Investigator Awards

PR Newswire

CHICAGO, Oct. 23, 2012

Foundation Recognizes 2012 Investigator Award Recipients at Annual Dinner

CHICAGO, Oct. 23, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Pulmonary Fibrosis
Foundation (PFF) announced today that it is accepting letters of intent for
its 2012 PFF Research Fund grants. Letters of intent will be accepted until
Monday, November 26, 2012.

One of the primary goals of the PFF Research Fund is to support research that
will ultimately lead to successful therapies for pulmonary fibrosis (PF). As
part of its mission, the Foundation has funded over $3,000,000 in basic and
clinical research.

The PFF Research Fund supports investigations that offer a high likelihood of
improving the understanding of pulmonary fibrosis in the following areas:
basic science, translational research, clinical research, and social
science/quality of life. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive
and ultimately fatal lung disease that affects approximately 200,000
individuals in the United States (US) and 138,000 individuals in the European
Union (EU). The annual mortality is estimated to be 40,000 people in the US,
with an average survival of 2–3 years following diagnosis. There is no cure
for IPF. There is no FDA-approved treatment for IPF in the US and only limited
therapeutic options available for individuals with mild-to-moderate IPF in the
EU, Canada, and Asia.

In 2012, the Foundation funded twenty-one research grants including four new
awards named after its co-founders: two I.M. Rosenzweig Young Investigator
Awards and two Albert Rose Established Investigator Awards. The four awards
total $200,000, with each recipient receiving $50,000 over a two-year period.
All grant applications are peer-reviewed and evaluated for their originality
and scientific merit by the Foundation's Research Advisory Committee. Only
the grant applicants that receive the best evaluations are selected for
awards. The Investigator Awards are funded in part by grants from InterMune,
Inc. and Boehringer Ingelheim.

The Foundation's Research Advisory Committee, which is comprised of recognized
international experts in PF, administers the peer-review process. A complete
list of the members of the Research Advisory Committee can be found at
http://www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org/medicalboard.

"Our dedication to funding innovative research in lung fibrosis will hopefully
lead to effective treatments for IPF and will aid in the recruitment and
retention of talented investigators," said Daniel M. Rose, MD, President and
Chief Executive Officer of the PFF. "We are thankful to the recognized
leaders in pulmonary fibrosis that make up our Research Advisory Committee.
They generously donate their time and expertise to ensure that we fund the
most promising research."

This year's awards recipients were recognized at the Foundation's annual
dinner, Breathe Benefit 2012: Community Inspiring a Cure, on Saturday, October
13, 2012.

Kevin K. Brown, MD, member of the PFF's Board of Directors and Chairman of the
Medical Advisory Board, recognized the following grant recipients:

I.M. Rosenzweig Young Investigator Awards

Haitao (Mark) Ji, PhD, University of Utah
"Design and Synthesis of Selective Beta-catenin/T-Cell Factor Inhibitors for
the
Treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis"
Funded by a grant from InterMune, Inc.

Rebecca Keith, MD, University of Colorado, Denver
"Therapeutic Targeting of PTPN-13 in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis"

Albert Rose Established Investigator Awards

James S. Hagood, MD, University of California, San Diego
"Extracellular Vesicles Alter Cell Phenotype in Pulmonary Fibrosis"

Glenn Rosen, MD, Stanford University
"Analysis of Novel Functions of Human Telomerase RNA in IPF"

"We are pleased to once again call for letters of intent for our PFF Research
Fund," said Dolly Kervitsky, Vice President of Patient Relations. "The PFF
Research Fund plays a significant role in our comprehensive Research Program
and we are thankful that so many talented and dedicated investigators are
working to end pulmonary fibrosis by studying different pathways and
mechanisms. Their critical research brings hope to the PF community."

For further information about the Awards, please visit
https://proposalcentral.altum.com. Letters of intent are due Monday, November
26, 2012. Fo

2012. For more information on the PFF Research Program, or to learn more
about the other programs and services offered by the PFF please visit
http://www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org or call 888.733.6741. 

About the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

The mission of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) is to help find a cure
for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), advocate for the pulmonary fibrosis
community, promote disease awareness, and provide a compassionate environment
for patients and their families. The PFF collaborates with physicians,
organizations, patients, and caregivers worldwide. December 1-3, 2011 the PFF
hosted its first biennial international scientific conference, IPF Summit
2011: From Bench to Bedside, in Chicago; PFF Summit 2013 will be held December
5–7, 2013, in La Jolla, California. For more information visit
www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org or call 888.733.6741.

About Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a condition in which over a period of
time the lung tissue becomes thickened, stiff, and scarred. The development of
the scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue becomes scarred and
thicker, the lungs lose their ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream.
As a result, the brain and other organs don't receive the oxygen they need. In
some cases, doctors can determine the cause of the fibrosis, but in most
cases, there is not a known cause. When there is no known etiology for the
fibrosis (and certain pathologic or radiographic criteria are met), the
disease is called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF. IPF affects
approximately 200,000 individuals in the United States (US), and 138,000
individuals in the European Union (EU). The annual mortality is estimated to
be 40,000 in the US alone, with an average survival of 2–3 years following
diagnosis. There is no cure for IPF. There is no FDA-approved treatment for
IPF in the US and limited therapeutic options available for individuals with
mild-to-moderate IPF in the EU, Canada, and Asia.

Contact:
Dolly Kervitsky, RCP, CCRC
Vice President, Patient Relations
888.733.6741
dkervitsky@pulmonaryfibrosis.org

SOURCE The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

Website: http://www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org